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525 West 22nd Street
New York, NY 10011
646 230 9610
Founded in 1995, Yancey Richardson represents artists working in photography, film, and lens-based media. The gallery is committed to working with museums, private institutions, leading art collectors, and other galleries to advance the careers of the artists we represent. Our current program includes emerging photographers as well as critically recognized, mid-career artists such as Mitch Epstein, Ori Gersht, Anthony Hernandez, Laura Letinsky, Andrew Moore, Zanele Muholi, Mickalene Thomas and Hellen van Meene. Additionally, the gallery has presented exhibitions of historically significant figures such as Lewis Baltz, William Eggleston, Ed Ruscha, August Sander, and Larry Sultan.
Artists Represented:
David Alekhuogie
Olivo Barbieri
Jared Bark
Omar Barquet
Mary Ellen Bartley
Sharon Core
Mitch Epstein
Terry Evans
Sandi Haber Fifield
Lynn Geesaman
Ori Gersht
Bryan Graf
Jitka Hanzlová
Anthony Hernandez
David Hilliard
Pello Irazu
Matthew Jensen
Kenneth Josephson
Kahn & Selesnick
Yousuf Karsh
Lisa Kerszi
Laura Letinsky
Mary Lum
Esko Mannikko
Andrew Moore
Zanele Muholi
Rachel Perry
Sebastião Salgado
Victoria Sambunaris
Lynn Saville
Mark Steinmetz
Larry Sultan
Mickalene Thomas
Tseng Kwong Chi
Bertien van Manen
Hellen van Meene
Guanyu Xu
Yamamoto Masao


 

 
© Jason Wyche.
Zanele Muholi at Yancey Richardson Gallery
Victoria Sambunaris at Yancey Richardson Gallery
Mark Steinmetz at Yancey Richardson Gallery
Paul Mpagi Sepuya at Yancey Richardson Gallery
Masao Yamamoto at Yancey Richardson Gallery
Mitch Epstein at Yancey Richardson Gallery
Bryan Graf at Yancey Richardson Gallery
Sharon Core at Yancey Richardson Gallery
Olivo Barbieri at Yancey Richardson Gallery
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Past Exhibitions

Mary Lum

temporary arrangements



April 4, 2024 - May 18, 2024
An exhibition of new work by artist Mary Lum will be on view from April 4 through May 18, 2024. The show, temporary arrangements, will present 12 new paintings and three collages that deconstruct and rebuild intimate views of the urban environment inspired by walks in New York and Paris.

Lynn Saville

Elevated



April 4, 2024 - May 18, 2024
Yancey Richardson is pleased to present Elevated, Lynn Saville’s third solo exhibition with the gallery. Seven photographs will be on view in the project gallery from April 4 – May 18, 2024.

Hellen van Meene

The Dissolve



February 22, 2024 - March 30, 2024
One of the most influential international photographers of her generation, Hellen van Meene is known for her intimate color portraits of adolescent girls and young women inspired by traditions of classical painting. An exhibition of recent work, The Dissolve will be on view from February 22 through March 30, 2024, with the majority of the photographs on view in New York for the first time. A reception with the artist will be held on Thursday, February 22 from 6-8 p.m. In her sixth solo exhibition at the gallery, Dutch artist van Meene continues her exploration of female identity with 20 photographs made between 2016 and 2023. Many of her young subjects are on the cusp of adulthood and van Meene highlights both the psychological tension and confusion often experienced during these transitional years. Her unique visual language employs an exceptional use of natural, luminous light reminiscent of 17th century Dutch painter Johannes Vermeer. Martin Barnes, Senior Curator of Photographs, V&A, wrote in the book Hellen van Meene: The Years Shall Run Like Rabbits (Aperture 2015), “Each photo resounds with painterly color harmonies. She has a lucid understanding of the nuances of natural light: how it can transform a scene before the lens into a picture that distills and then transcends the depiction of reality. Coupling this with her choreographed scenes and her intuitive use of gesture in the faces and attitudes enacted by her subjects, she has consistently produced the condition for photographic transformations.” Van Meene’s subjects are often caught in dreamlike states or otherworldly situations. In one, a bride stands calmly as the train of her wedding dress ignites in a semi-circle of flames. In another, a sitter cradles a fish like a baby, and in another, butterflies carefully position themselves on the subject’s face, neck, and chest. One young woman immersed in a body of water is surrounded by flowers while fully dressed, recalling Shakespeare’s Ophelia. Van Meene’s subjects appear detached and unflummoxed about their unusual situations, absorbing the ambiguity of being at the brink of adulthood, while caught in the liminal space between childhood and womanhood. In the words of van Meene: “The girl’s dreams go beyond her daily life, as she yearns to be a butterfly and take flight into the skies. Her untangled hair serves as a powerful symbol of freedom and flight, inspiring us all to chase our dreams and embrace our innermost desires.” For more than 20 years, Hellen van Meene (Dutch, b. 1972) has been known as one of the world’s top photographers for her carefully staged portraits of adolescent girls. Her work has been exhibited internationally in museums including Fotografiska, New York (2024); Museum of Fine Arts Boston (2019); Musee d’Orsay, Paris (2016); Palais de Beaux-Arts, Brussels (2015); Brooklyn Museum, New York (2009); Art Institute of Chicago (2008); Van Gogh Museum, Amsterdam (2008); and Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York (2007). Van Meene’s photographs are held in institutional collections worldwide, including the Museum of Modern Art, New York; Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York; Art Institute of Chicago; San Francisco Museum of Modern Art; Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles; National Museum of Women in the Arts, Washington D.C.; Museum of Fine Art, Boston; High Museum of Art, Atlanta; Victoria & Albert Museum, London; Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam; Fries Museum, Netherlands; Museum of Photography, Netherlands; Folkwang Museum Essen, Germany; Huis Marseille, Amsterdam; and Museo Artium del Pais Vasco, Spain. Van Meene is the subject of five artist monographs, including Hellen van Meene: The Years Shall Run Like Rabbits (Aperture, 2015); Hellen van Meene: tout va disparaître (Schirmer/Mosel, 2009); Hellen van Meene: New Work (Schirmer/Mosel, 2006); Hellen van Meene: Portraits (Aperture, 2004); and Hellen van Meene: Japan Series (The Museum of Contemporary Photography, Chicago and De Hallen, Haarlem, the Netherlands, 2002). Van Meene lives and works in Heiloo, Netherlands.

Carolyn Drake

Glorify Yourself



February 22, 2024 - March 30, 2024
Begun in 2020, Glorify Yourself is the newest photographic series by Carolyn Drake, in which the artist turns the camera on herself, experimenting with self-portraiture and offering an exploration of, as Drake says, “the universe of desires and delusions that gave rise to the world I inhabit.” The exhibition will be on view from February 22 through March 30, 2024. An opening reception will be held on February 22, from 6 – 8 PM. The series takes its title from the book Glorify Yourself, a “beauty and charm guide” for women, popular in the U.S. during the 1940s and 1950s. The guide included chapter titles such as “Inviting Lips” and “Sitting Technique,” offering advice for its female readers on how to increase their allure to men. With pages of the book ‘s instructions plastered on one wall of the gallery, Drake’s darkly comedic self-portraits intersect with the misogynistic material that inspired them. Describing her process, Drake states; “With a mixture of satire and scorn, I began putting myself in the positions described in the book, exploring my relationship to its creed.” In Self-Portrait with Gene Tierney (Inviting Lips), Drake holds a page ripped from the book in front of her face. The page shows a portrait of a woman whose face has been cut out, replaced by Drake’s own mouth, agape in a silent scream. The caption beneath the image reads “Gene Tierney’s beautiful full mouth is one of her most attractive features.” In what could be seen as the pair to this image, The Face of Gene Tierney (Inviting Lips), these so-called “inviting lips” are revealed in a surreal composition that includes Tierney’s disembodied face suspended by a thread, and a pair of tweezers, held by the artist, pointing ominously towards it. Drake’s irreverent interrogation of this highly constructed, stereotypical notion of femininity exposes the degree to which women’s bodies have been controlled in service of the male gaze. Indeed, when we consider the series within the context of current events, including the recent rollback of abortion rights in the U.S., we can see it in part as Drake asserting her agency to present her body in whatever guise she chooses. In an act of defiance, the artist offers us so-called “self-portraits” in which her face is mostly obscured behind cut-outs and pages from the book, or disguised with a wig as she attempts to perform the prescribed exercises. Drake challenges our traditional understanding of the genre, offering us an introspective exploration of her identity and her shifting experience of gender and sexuality that refuses to be confined within fixed boundaries. Born in California in 1971, Drake’s work has recently been exhibited at the Henri Cartier Bresson Foundation, the High Museum, and the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. She has published five photo books: Two Rivers (2013), Wild Pigeon (2014), Internat (2017), Knit Club (TBW Books, 2020), and Men Untitled (TBW Books 2023). Drake’s forthcoming project I’ll Let You Be In My Dreams If You’ll Let Me Be In Yours (Mack 2024) is co-authored with her partner Andres Gonzalez. She is the recipient of a Guggenheim fellowship, the Henri Cartier Bresson Award, and a Fulbright fellowship, among other prizes. Drake is a member of Magnum Photos and lives in Vallejo, California.

Sandi Haber Fifield

The Thing in Front of You



January 11, 2024 - February 17, 2024
The Thing in Front of You, an exhibition of unique photocollages and small-scale wall sculptures by artist Sandi Haber Fifield, will be on view at Yancey Richardson from January 11 through February 17, 2024. An opening with the artist will be held on Thursday, January 11 from 6:30 – 8:30 PM.

Rachel Perry

Unfolded



January 11, 2024 - February 17, 2024
New work by artist Rachel Perry will be presented at Yancey Richardson, opening on January 11 and on view through February 17, 2024. The exhibition, Unfolded, includes photography from Perry’s ongoing series, Lost in My Life, (2009-present), featuring the artist physically immersed in the materials with which she creates her other works of art. Unfolded also premieres Perry’s series of minimalist needlepoints on canvas made during the pandemic. An opening reception will be held on Thursday, January 11 from 6:30 – 8:30 PM.

Andrew Moore

Whiskey Point and Other Tales



November 16, 2023 - January 6, 2024
New work by acclaimed photographer Andrew Moore will be on view at Yancey Richardson from November 16, 2023, through January 6, 2024. The exhibition, Whiskey Point and Other Tales, delves into the dazzling scenes and moody vistas of the storied Hudson Valley of New York. Through his vividly colored, large-scale photographs, Andrew Moore is known for investigating the intersections of historical moments in the U.S. and abroad, documenting the natural and built landscapes in places such Detroit, the American South, the Great Plains, New York City, Cuba, and Bosnia.

Yamamoto Masao

Ambrotypes



November 16, 2023 - January 6, 2024
The emotional power of photography – and the ability of an image to evoke memories – will be illustrated in an exhibition of new photographic work by Japanese artist Yamamoto Masao. The artist’s exhibition, Ambrotypes, titled after a 19th century process that produces a one-of-a-kind image on glass, will be on view at Yancey Richardson from November 16, 2023, through January 6, 2024. An opening reception will be held on Thursday, November 16 from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.

Mickalene Thomas

je t'adore



September 9, 2023 - November 11, 2023
This fall, multidisciplinary artist Mickalene Thomas will unveil a collection of new work in the exhibition je t’adore, at Yancey Richardson from September 9 through November 11, 2023. In je t’adore, Thomas presents 13 large-scale mixed media photo collages inspired by her research into the imagery of Black female erotica featured in the calendars of Jet magazine and the pages of the 1950s French publication, Nus Exotique.

Richard Avedon, Deanna Dikeman, Jess T. Dugan, Mitch Epstein, LaToya Ruby Frazier, David Hilliard, Lisa Kereszi, Tommy Kha, Justine Kurland, Jarod Lew, D'Angelo Lovell Williams, Marilyn Minter, Zora J Murff, Sage Sohier, Larry Sultan, Leonard Suryajaya, Mickalene Thomas

Intimate Strangers



July 12, 2023 - August 18, 2023
Intimate Strangers, an exhibition of powerful and highly personal photographs and video made by visual artists who have positioned a parent or parents as central subjects in a body of work, will be on view at Yancey Richardson from July 12 through August 18, 2023. An opening will be held on Wednesday, July 12, from 6 to 8 p.m. The 16 artists featured in the exhibition include Deanna Dikeman, Jess T. Dugan, Mitch Epstein, LaToya Ruby Frazier, David Hilliard, Lisa Kereszi, Tommy Kha, Justine Kurland, Jarod Lew, Marilyn Minter, Zora J Murff, Sage Sohier, Leonard Suryajaya, Mickalene Thomas, D’Angelo Lovell Williams, and Larry Sultan. Intentionally—and sometimes unintentionally—the images in Intimate Strangers reflect on diverse and relevant social issues, ranging from the pursuit of the American dream and stigmas around aging to LGBTQ+ concerns, as well as topics related to immigration, Black masculinity, and addiction. For David Hilliard, Mickalene Thomas, D’Angelo Lovell Williams, and Leonard Suryajaya, photography is used as a means of bridging the relationship between a heterosexual, and sometimes estranged parent, and their queer adult child. For Tommy Kha and Jarod Lew, both children of immigrants, the process of making images assists in unraveling the story of a parent’s past whose previous life has been hidden. In Lew’s case, he discovered that his mother had been engaged to Vincent Chin when he was murdered in a historic anti-Asian hate crime. With the work of Mitch Epstein, Larry Sultan, and Marilyn Minter, the artist looks through the photographic lens to grapple with the vulnerability of an aging or ill parent. Larry Sultan spent a decade photographing his parents, simultaneously exploring the nuances of their daily dynamics and the deception of family mythmaking. Mitch Epstein’s picture of his 82-year-old father, a local business leader in Holyoke, Massachusetts, whose family business collapsed in bankruptcy, also exposes the vulnerable side of his aging father by photographing him from above— bald, grey, and bandaged. D’Angelo Lovell Williams and Zora J Murff both create images that examine Black masculinity and the power dynamics of fathers and children. In Daddy Issues, 2019, Williams photographs themself in an arm-wrestling contest with their father, on a rare visit together. In the image Gas Money, 2019, Murff shows a folded $20 bill being handed from one man to a younger one. Marilyn Minter’s rarely seen black and white photographs of her mother were made in 1969 while she was a student in art school. When classmates first viewed the images, they reacted in shock exclaiming, “Oh my god. That’s your mother?!” She had not realized how intensely the images would resonate as her mother, a drug addict suffering from an anxiety disorder, lived in a nightgown, and rarely left the house. Minter did not show the work again until 1994. The process of portraiture is often an act of collaboration, and in the case of many of the artists, their parents were active participants in the construction of fabricated scenes. From 1998 until his father’s death from COVID in 2020, David Hilliard created a series of quizzical, narrative tableaux featuring his heterosexual, blue-collar parent. As a queer artist son acknowledging his lineage, he replicated his father’s chest tattoo on his own body. The two men visually evoke one other in Hilliard’s father and son triptych, Rock Bottom, 2008. While studying at Yale University with David Hillard in the early 2000s, Mickalene Thomas recalls Hillard saying, “You should photograph someone with whom you have a complex relationship.” Thomas’s choice of her mother as a muse marked a watershed moment, inspiring much of her concurrent and future work celebrating the beauty and sexuality of Black women. In the diptych Madame Mama Bush and Afro Goddess with Hands Between Legs, 2006/2008, Thomas pairs a photograph of her mother as a sensuous odalisque, bare-breasted and eyes closed, with a sexually charged self-portrait staring directly at the camera. Thomas’s mother passed away a few years after the images were made. Sage Sohier’s mother was a professional model in her younger years and the mature woman depicted in her photographs still retains a glamour and grace from that time. In her series Witness to Beauty, Sohier recreates memories from childhood of her mother’s beauty routines, planned and performed in collaboration with an affectionate wry humor. Leonard Suryajaya, a queer Chinese Indonesian artist, immigrated to the U.S. in 2006 to study theater. In his elaborately staged photographs featuring his parents, sister, and husband, the artist combines performance, installation, and photography in an absurd but affectionate montage, which both questions familial authority and asserts his identity. Dressing up and posing for the camera becomes an act of role-playing, providing a space for parents and their nonconformist children to relate. The video Letter to My Father by the queer nonbinary artist Jess T. Dugan offers a platform for the artist to speak directly to their estranged father about the pain of non-acceptance. The work was presented last year in A Trillion Sunsets: A Century of Overload at the International Center of Photography (ICP) in New York.

John Divola

Dogs Chasing My Car in the Desert



June 2, 2023 - July 7, 2023
Known for his documentary approach to subjects that range from sublime to ironic, the California-based artist John Divola has mined the territory between photography and conceptual art for more than 40 years. Two of his best-known and iconic series from the 1990s will be on view at Yancey Richardson from June 1 through July 7, 2023. In "Isolated Houses" Divola uses the vernacular architecture of the California desert to explore existential themes of isolation and desire. "Dogs Chasing My Car in the Desert" reveals the age-old chase between man and beast with a wry and philosophical edge. Photographed between 1995 and 1998, the images in "Isolated Houses" were all made in the high desert of Southern California, including the east end of the Morongo Valley Basin, Wonder Valley, and surrounding the town of 29 Palms. The small, simple box-like structures sitting alone on the vast desert plain are framed in square compositions, echoing the geometry of the flat landscape. They capsulize the artist’s career-long interest in the tension between specificity and abstraction in photography. Illuminated by the extraordinary western light, the structures wear their neglect with a dignity that elevates their humble existence. The artist notes, “The desert is not empty. However, it is vacant enough to bestow a certain weight to whatever is present. Add this to a heightened awareness of your own presence and the desert can take on an existential quality.” While traversing the desert region working on Isolated Houses, Divola frequently came across dogs who would chase his car. In 1996, he started to capture portraits of the dogs while in motion with a motorized 35 mm camera and high-speed film, evoking the spirit of Eadweard Muybridge’s exploration of stop motion photography. The work resulted in the now classic series "Dogs Chasing My Car in the Desert," a collection of grainy, black and white images that look at the herding relationship between man and animal with a slightly comic approach. “With one hand on the steering wheel, I would hold the camera out the window and expose anywhere from a few frames to a complete roll of film,” Divola explained. “Contemplating a dog chasing a car invites any number of metaphors and juxtapositions: culture and nature, the domestic and the wild, love and hate, joy and fear, the heroic and the idiotic. Here we have two vectors and velocities, that of a dog and that of a car and, seeing that a camera will never capture reality and that a dog will never catch a car, evidence of devotion to a hopeless enterprise.” Born in Los Angeles in 1949, Divola earned a B.A. from California State University, Northridge in 1971 and an MFA from University of California, Los Angeles in 1974, where he studied under photographer Robert Heinecken. Since 1975, he has taught photography and art at numerous institutions including California Institute of the Arts (1978-1988), and since 1988 he has been a Professor of Art at the University of California, Riverside. Divola was featured in the 1981 and 2017 Whitney Biennials and was the subject of a three-museum retrospective in 2013 at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, the Santa Barbara Museum of Art, and the Pomona College Museum of Art. His various projects have been published in 11 monographs. Since 1975, Divola’s work has been featured in numerous exhibitions in the United States, Japan, Europe, Mexico, and Australia, including the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; Museum of Fine Arts, Houston; San Francisco Museum of Modern Art; Walker Art Center; Art Institute of Chicago; Tate Modern; and Fondation Cartier pour l’art Contemporain. Divola’s work is held in numerous prestigious collections including multiple New York institutions such as The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Museum of Modern Art, and the Whitney Museum of American Art, as well as the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art; Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles; Victoria & Albert Museum, London; The Tate, London; and Centre Pompidou, Paris. Among Divola’s awards are multiple Individual Artist Fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts (1973, 1976, 1979, 1990), a John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Fellowship (1986), a Fintridge Foundation Fellowship (1998), a City of Los Angeles Artist Grant (1999), and a California Arts Council Individual Artist Fellowship (1998).

John Divola

Isolated Houses



June 1, 2023 - July 7, 2023
Known for his documentary approach to subjects that range from sublime to ironic, the California-based artist John Divola has mined the territory between photography and conceptual art for more than 40 years. Two of his best-known and iconic series from the 1990s will be on view at Yancey Richardson from June 1 through July 7, 2023. In "Isolated Houses" Divola uses the vernacular architecture of the California desert to explore existential themes of isolation and desire. "Dogs Chasing My Car in the Desert" reveals the age-old chase between man and beast with a wry and philosophical edge. Photographed between 1995 and 1998, the images in "Isolated Houses" were all made in the high desert of Southern California, including the east end of the Morongo Valley Basin, Wonder Valley, and surrounding the town of 29 Palms. The small, simple box-like structures sitting alone on the vast desert plain are framed in square compositions, echoing the geometry of the flat landscape. They capsulize the artist’s career-long interest in the tension between specificity and abstraction in photography. Illuminated by the extraordinary western light, the structures wear their neglect with a dignity that elevates their humble existence. The artist notes, “The desert is not empty. However, it is vacant enough to bestow a certain weight to whatever is present. Add this to a heightened awareness of your own presence and the desert can take on an existential quality.” While traversing the desert region working on Isolated Houses, Divola frequently came across dogs who would chase his car. In 1996, he started to capture portraits of the dogs while in motion with a motorized 35 mm camera and high-speed film, evoking the spirit of Eadweard Muybridge’s exploration of stop motion photography. The work resulted in the now classic series "Dogs Chasing My Car in the Desert," a collection of grainy, black and white images that look at the herding relationship between man and animal with a slightly comic approach. “With one hand on the steering wheel, I would hold the camera out the window and expose anywhere from a few frames to a complete roll of film,” Divola explained. “Contemplating a dog chasing a car invites any number of metaphors and juxtapositions: culture and nature, the domestic and the wild, love and hate, joy and fear, the heroic and the idiotic. Here we have two vectors and velocities, that of a dog and that of a car and, seeing that a camera will never capture reality and that a dog will never catch a car, evidence of devotion to a hopeless enterprise.” Born in Los Angeles in 1949, Divola earned a B.A. from California State University, Northridge in 1971 and an MFA from University of California, Los Angeles in 1974, where he studied under photographer Robert Heinecken. Since 1975, he has taught photography and art at numerous institutions including California Institute of the Arts (1978-1988), and since 1988 he has been a Professor of Art at the University of California, Riverside. Divola was featured in the 1981 and 2017 Whitney Biennials and was the subject of a three-museum retrospective in 2013 at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, the Santa Barbara Museum of Art, and the Pomona College Museum of Art. His various projects have been published in 11 monographs. Since 1975, Divola’s work has been featured in numerous exhibitions in the United States, Japan, Europe, Mexico, and Australia, including the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; Museum of Fine Arts, Houston; San Francisco Museum of Modern Art; Walker Art Center; Art Institute of Chicago; Tate Modern; and Fondation Cartier pour l’art Contemporain. Divola’s work is held in numerous prestigious collections including multiple New York institutions such as The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Museum of Modern Art, and the Whitney Museum of American Art, as well as the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art; Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles; Victoria & Albert Museum, London; The Tate, London; and Centre Pompidou, Paris. Among Divola’s awards are multiple Individual Artist Fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts (1973, 1976, 1979, 1990), a John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Fellowship (1986), a Fintridge Foundation Fellowship (1998), a City of Los Angeles Artist Grant (1999), and a California Arts Council Individual Artist Fellowship (1998).

Jitka Hanzlová

Water That Dreams



April 13, 2023 - May 26, 2023
Water That Dreams, an exhibition of photographs by Czech born, German based artist Jitka Hanzlová, will be on view at Yancey Richardson in Chelsea from April 13 to May 26. Selected from Hanzlová’s extended project WATER 2013-2019, the 46 intimate color photographs will be presented for the first time in the U.S. Known for her poetic approach to landscape, portraiture and still life, in her series WATER 2013-2019, Hanzlová has turned her attention towards the essential and the elemental, exploring water in all its different states of being: liquid, gaseous, solid. The exhibition features selections from six chapters of WATER: Ur, Ice, Clouds, Human Dark, Human Light, and Silent Blue.

Larry Sultan

Pictures from Home



February 23, 2023 - April 8, 2023

Mitch Epstein

Recreation



February 23, 2023 - April 8, 2023

Victoria Sambunaris

High and Dry



January 5, 2023 - February 18, 2023

Mary Ellen Bartley

Morandi's Books



October 27, 2022 - December 23, 2022
Yancey Richardson is pleased to present Morandi’s Books, photographs by Mary Ellen Bartley, on view from October 27 through December 23, 2022. Morandi’s Books springs from Bartley’s 2020 residency at Casa Morandi in Bologna, Italy, where she was invited to work with the personal library of Giorgio Morandi, the twentieth-century Italian artist whose quiet still life paintings have been an important source of inspiration from the beginning of her practice.

Laura Letinsky

Albeit



October 27, 2022 - December 23, 2022
Yancey Richardson is pleased to present Albeit, an exhibition of photographs by Laura Letinsky. Comprised of photographic assemblages made in 2013 using a flatbed scanner and magazines, the exhibition demonstrates Letinsky’s innovative approach to still life. These early forays in substituting printed matter in place of objects in the studio are being exhibited for the first time, and display experimental methods later developed in her series: Ill Form & Void Full (2014), To Want for Nothing (2019), A Blind Promise Or, A Rash Boon (2020).

Anthony Hernandez

Screened Pictures X



September 8, 2022 - October 22, 2022
Yancey Richardson Gallery is pleased to present Screened Pictures X, an exhibition of photographs by Anthony Hernandez showcasing the most recent development in the artist’s career-long exploration of the urban landscape of his native Los Angeles.

John Divola

Swimming Drunk



April 16, 2022 - May 21, 2022
Yancey Richardson is pleased to present Swimming Drunk, an exhibition of photographs by John Divola. The exhibition includes two photographic series that represent the breadth of the artist’s more than 40 year career: Zuma Series (1977-1978), and Daybreak (2015-2020). Both series are a result of Divola’s engagement with abandoned buildings, and his interest in transforming a situation through photography. Thus, the photographs do not serve as mere descriptions of the scenes depicted but instead are offered as artifacts from the artist’s physical and experiential interventions within these environments.

Carolyn Drake

Knit Club



March 5, 2022 - April 9, 2022

Mary Lum

when the sky is a shape



January 8, 2022 - February 26, 2022

Zanele Muholi

Awe Maaah!



September 10, 2021 - October 16, 2021
Yancey Richardson Gallery is pleased to present Awe Maaah!, an exhibition of new paintings and photographs by South African artist and visual activist Zanele Muholi. Internationally acclaimed as a photographer, this is the first large-scale exhibition of Muholi’s paintings and the artist’s fourth solo show with the gallery.

Sandi Haber Fifield

As Birdsongs Emerge | The Certainty of Nothing



April 15, 2021 - May 28, 2021

David Alekhuogie

Naïveté



March 6, 2021 - April 10, 2021
Yancey Richardson Gallery is pleased to present Naïveté, an exhibition of new photographs, collage and fabric sculptures by Los Angeles-based artist David Alekhuogie. Informed by his 2019 trip to Nigeria, the birthplace of his father, Alekhuogie’s recent work incorporates African sculpture and textiles to question the route through which African Americans become cognizant of their cultural heritage, authorship, and the hierarchy of art versus craft. A selection of works from the artist’s 2018 series To Live and Die in LA will be featured in the project gallery. This is the artist’s first exhibition with the gallery.

Terry Evans

Ancient Prairies



January 14, 2021 - February 20, 2021

Jared Bark

Time and Materials



November 12, 2020 - January 9, 2021

Matt Lipps

Solve for X



September 10, 2020 - October 24, 2020

Tseng Kwong Chi

East Meets West



February 13, 2020 - April 4, 2020
Yancey Richardson is pleased to present East Meets West, a selection of photographic self-portraits made between 1979 and 1987 by Tseng Kwong Chi (1950 - 1990). Combining performance and photography, political satire and personal identity, Tseng’s pioneering series exemplifies the art of the eighties while anticipating the social, political and philosophical themes of the present day.

Guanyu Xu

Temporarily Censored Home



February 13, 2020 - April 4, 2020
Yancey Richardson is pleased to present Temporarily Censored Home, Guanyu Xu’s debut exhibition with the gallery. Since 2018, Beijing-born, Chicago-based artist Guanyu Xu has secretly created photographic installations throughout his childhood home in Beijing in order to queer his parents’ domestic space, transforming it into a scene of revelation, protest and reclamation. Using collected images from Western film and fashion magazines, photographs from family albums, as well as portraits of himself with other gay men, Xu enacts a deeply intimate and political performance.

Yamamoto Masao

Itteki



December 12, 2019 - February 8, 2020
Yancey Richardson Gallery is pleased to present Itteki, an exhibition of new work by Japanese artist Yamamoto Masao. Focusing on Bonsai, the Japanese art of cultivating miniaturized potted trees, this series of toned, gelatin silver prints continues Yamamoto’s exploration of the emotional power of photography through landscape and his surrounding environment.

Laura Letinsky

To Want For Nothing



September 12, 2019 - October 19, 2019

Jared Bark

Public/Private



September 12, 2019 - October 19, 2019

Transcript - Yale MFA Photography 2019 Thesis Show



July 11, 2019 - August 23, 2019

Sharon Core

Oldenburgs



May 16, 2019 - July 3, 2019

Lisa Kereszi



May 16, 2019 - July 3, 2019

Victoria Sambunaris

Land Mark



April 11, 2019 - May 11, 2019

Terry Evans

The Inhabited Prairie



April 11, 2019 - May 11, 2019

Larry Sultan

Domestic Theater



February 21, 2019 - April 6, 2019

Andrew Moore

Blue Sweep



December 13, 2018 - February 9, 2019

Sandi Haber Fifield

Lineations 2



October 25, 2018 - December 8, 2018

Rachel Perry

Halos



October 25, 2018 - December 8, 2018

Ori Gersht

Fragile Land



September 6, 2018 - October 20, 2018

Interventions



July 11, 2018 - August 24, 2018

David Maisel

Atlas



May 17, 2018 - July 6, 2018