Skip to main content
Tina Kim Gallery
525 West 21st Street
New York, NY 10011
212 716 1100
Founded in New York in 2001 by Tina Kim and located in Chelsea, Tina Kim Gallery is celebrated for its unique programming that emphasizes international contemporary artists, historical overviews, and independently curated shows. With the gallery’s strong focus on Asian contemporary artists, Tina Kim has created a platform for important emerging and renowned women artists such as Minouk Lim, Wook-Kyung Choi, and Suki Seokyeong Kang, and has become a go-to destination for Korean contemporary and historical art. Through its programming, the gallery works closely with internationally renowned curators for special exhibitions and produces scholarly art publications.
Artists Represented:
CHUNG SEOYOUNG
DAVIDE BALLIANO
GHADA AMER
GIMHONGSOK
HA CHONG-HYUN
KIBONG RHEE
KIM TSCHANG-YEUL
KIM YONG-IK
KWON YOUNG-WOO
LEE SEUNG JIO
MINOUK LIM
MIRE LEE
PARK CHAN-KYONG
PARK SEO-BO
SUH SEUNG-WON
SUKI SEOKYEONG KANG 
TANIA PÉREZ CÓRDOVA
WOOK-KYUNG CHOI
PACITA ABAD
Works Available By:


LEE UFAN
LOUISE BOURGEOIS
JOHN PAI
MINORU NIIZUMA
CHUNG SANG-HWA
CHUNG CHANG-SUP


 
Current Exhibition

Mire Lee

Carriers



September 15, 2022 - October 22, 2022
For her first solo exhibition with Tina Kim Gallery, Mire Lee presents Carriers, the continental debut of her eponymous body of work shown at Art Sonje, Korea in 2020, and the Schinkel Pavillon in 2021. In the front gallery, a spectral video depicting Lee’s mother is projected onto a cast monolithic form, joined by a slippery curtain, and other grayscale sculptural casts, molded from functional objects that “carry” in their day-to-day utility. Deeper into the space, Lee’s quasi-biomorphic “carriers” hide suspended behind a filthy, maze-like wall of used concrete molds, spurting an unidentifiable fluid out of a circulatory pump system commonly used in both dialysis treatments and industrial manufacturing. A long tank catches the fleshtone discharge, pooling before it is spit back out from the carriers’ unending, regurgatory struggle. A telling reference for Lee is vore, a fetish involving the impossible urge to swallow the object of one’s desire in a total annihilation of boundary between self and other, necessitating a supreme violence. Rather than offer a clear aggressor or desiring party, Carriers, both the work and as an exhibition, instead turns to uncompromising partiality, reminiscent of the familiar or bodily in its spurting cavities without committing to a single, identifiable form. It is presented concurrently with Lee’s inclusion in the Venice Biennale, the Busan Biennale, and the 58th Carnegie International, in addition to her two solo shows at the MMK Frankfurt and the Kunstmuseum Den Haag in 2022.

 
Past Exhibitions

Minouk Lim

Fossil of High Noon



May 19, 2022 - July 1, 2022
Tina Kim Gallery is pleased to present Fossil of High Noon, Minouk Lim’s second solo exhibition at the gallery, on view from May 19 – July 1, 2022. Fossil of High Noon is paradoxical. The sun of high noon makes the shadows that fall to the ground the darkest. A fossil in itself is close to a ghost-state. A space without location is born as it approaches the present without notice, though it has existed since the deep past. The simultaneous and fragmentary heterochrony remind us of time’s irreversibility. This exhibition is about departure due to spatial and temporal discrepancies, while simultaneously containing the possibility of reunion. Fossil of High Noon alludes to today’s world; hatred, war, terrorism, globalization, refugees (located in non-places), climate change, and diseases repeat in an endless cycle. Minouk Lim (b. 1968) continues to center aesthetics and politics in her artistic practice, rejecting binaries of subject and other; individual and community; documentary and fiction; assailant and victim; active and passive. Lim has stated that aesthetic practice provides imperative new models by which to criticize histories of omission, as well as to formulate new avenues of questioning.[1] She explores measurements of time in unchronological order and reexamines signs emerging from the midst of oblivion through suspicion and speculation. From a sculpture in a non-fixed and fragile form, a sound that flows and disappears, a video that aligns facts and fictions in jump cuts, a performance that becomes complete with the assembly of bodies and witnessing, to a piece in which each of these mediums interacts with and translates one another, Lim’s media works translate the hidden voices and figures of history through the “readjustment of senses.” Critic Namsee Kim has referred to Lim’s approach to media as psychic, in that her works “track down the disappeared and the invisible” through a state of being “fluid, disappearing, and invisible.” The work Portable Keeper_Sea begins with a bird’s eye view. Buoy sea markers wander around a swimming girl and form a distinctive territory. The girl submits her body to the waves of the sea, a skirt and jeogori[2] weltering under the water, creating a parallel. Between the sky and the sea; above and below water; tradition and the present; memory and future; life and death; the camera sutures these binaries and allows estranged generations to coexist in an alternate dimension. The low bell chimes in the video scatter on, taking over one another’s howling echo. Buddhist wind chimes in the shape of a carp fish allude to a proverb, “Fish do not close their eyes even in sleep,” an effort to both stay awake and devote oneself to self-discipline. Lim’s grandmother, who stood alone without solitude, taught her self-organization and the “power of imagining the unseen”. Dudu Mulmul (頭頭物物), sculptures installed along with the video, contains a diverse assortment of miscellanea that could have arrived at any or all seashore(s) in the world. Each object embodies an uncertain secret of when, where, and how it came to be there. The confluence of these fragments of time-space becomes a sculpture with fluid materials such as transparent resin. Critic Harry C. H. Choi mentioned, “Lim imagines a medium that resists stasis and is constantly in the process of formation and articulation—one that could be characterized as a model of sculpture as verb… the artist’s sculptures could be construed as literally producing actions and reactions in the present continuous, as they assume the possibility of being morphed and re-arranged, seek to deliver memories of the past, and resist pre-existing customs of the medium.”[3] These works are also accompanied by Discreetly, a spiraling frame or door-shaped form with a layered set of allusions in its title, spanning from a nameplate centered at the top of the sculpture. The Korean “sori-somun” (“sound-rumor”) is written on the nameplate, referencing an idiom that translates “without any sound or rumor,” meaning “stealthily” or “without revealing.” Lim complicates this idiomatic gesture by excluding the Korean word for “without” from the title, allowing the connotation of “discreet” to mingle with the idea of a small gateway for a sound. If Lim’s Portable Keeper illustrate an inclination toward movement, continuation, circulation and conversion of states of being, the work instead speaks to the simultaneous gestures of the invisible and the separable. In the front gallery, Lim showcases her new liquid drawing series Dudu, using fluid and heat sensitive materials such as resin as a thin, transparent bed for strands of nylon adorned with protruding thorns. Directly facing the drawing, her new Portable Keeper pieces in this exhibition appear as though dredged from an era of dinosaurs or forgotten kings. The cane resembles animals with bones and feathers, neither natural nor artificial. The senses that evaporate, scatter, or shatter before making sense in the world, the byproducts of a fragile world that can only be felt by fumbling, lend their bodies and senses to the canes and form an antithesis of compassion. The victims who were massacred without knowing in the standoff of the ideological camps; brothers separated in war and forgetful of each other’s names and faces; the lives that have embraced and endured what still cannot be said are far from living in a clear or simple world. The subtle chime of a bell in the wind, the intangible waves of shimmering heat, and the world after parting all address us through not language, but senses. Like the cuckoo in the clock that never fails to tell the time, even in an empty house, Portable Keeper mourns the scattering hopelessness of oblivion. ABOUT MINOUK LIM Minouk Lim (b. 1968) is an artist of many forms, creating works that span different genres and media, encompassing writing, music, video, installation, and performance as a means of deepening the scope of her questions. Lim’s practice recalls historic losses, ruptures, and repressed traumas. Rooted in language, and specifically, the politics of expression, her work does not replay past events, but rather elevates experiences, memories, and feelings through the means of imagining or engaging structural beings of non-human witnesses in her performative sculptural objects and installations. Lim’s major solo exhibitions include New Town Ghost GAGAHOHO, DAAD gallery, Berlin, Germany (2017); The Promise of If at PLATEAU Samsung Museum of Art, Seoul (2015); United Paradox at Portikus, Frankfurt (2015); Heat of Shadow at the Walker Art Center, Minneapolis (2012); and Jump Cut in Art Sonje Center, Seoul (2008). Lim has presented a series of site-specific performances and projects including Fire Cliff (2010-2015) and Endless Void, Curatorial Project at Democracy Human Rights Memorial Hall, Seoul (2019); O Tannenbaum performance project, ASAKUSA Space Production, Tokyo (2018). Lim has also participated in a number of group exhibitions and biennials including Title Match 2021: Minouk Lim vs. Young-Gyu Jang at Seoul Museum of Art, Seoul (2021); Born a Woman, Suwon Museum of Art, Suwon, Korea (2020); the Setouchi Triennale (2016); Sydney Biennial (2016); Taipei Biennial (2016); Political populism, Kunsthalle Wien (2015); Paris Triennale 2012; Liverpool Biennial (2010); The Time of Others, Museum of Tokyo (2010), and Your Bright Future: 12 Contemporary Artists from Korea, LACMA (2009-10). Lim’s works reside in the collections of the Guggenheim Museum; Centre Pompidou; National Museum of Modern and Contemporary Arts, Korea: Seoul Museum of Art; ArtSonje Center, Korea; Kadist Art Foundation, San Francisco; Walker Art Center; Tate Modern; and the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. ABOUT TINA KIM GALLERY Founded in New York in 2001 by Tina Kim and located in Chelsea, Tina Kim Gallery is celebrated for its unique programming that emphasizes international contemporary artists, historical overviews, and independently curated shows. With the gallery’s strong focus on Asian contemporary artists, Tina Kim has become a leading figure in introducing the Korean Dansaekhwa art movement to the American audience. Furthermore, she has created a platform for emerging and renowned artists such as Lee Seung Jio, Pacita Abad, Kim Tschang-Yeul, Tania Pérez Córdova, Minouk Lim, Davide Balliano, and Suki Seokyeong Kang. Through its programming, the gallery works closely with internationally renowned curators for special exhibitions and produces scholarly art publications.

Kwon Young-Woo

Gestures in Hanji



March 24, 2022 - April 30, 2022
“The range of processes from ripping to creating penetrating holes...is not different from drawing lines and dots with a brush. Both contain the performance of the artist’s volition.” -Kwon Young-Woo Tina Kim Gallery is pleased to present Gestures in Hanji, a solo exhibition of Kwon Young-Woo (1926-2013) who was a leading artist of the Dansaekhwa movement, on view from March 24 - April 30, 2022. This is the artist’s first exhibition with the gallery featuring Kwon’s signature works on paper from the 1970s to 2000s. The exhibition traces the trajectory of Kwon’s work throughout his artistic career: his early 1970’s works showcasing his method of cutting and tearing sediment-like layers of hanji (traditional Korean mulberry paper); his Paris period (1978-1989), in which he first introduced pools of color into his compositions; his return to Korea in 1989, which prompted his singular attention toward overlapping lines of color; and finally, his return to the two-dimensional plane in the early 2000’s with misty-white geometric forms over bare canvas backgrounds. One of the few Dansaekhwa artists trained in Oriental ink painting, Kwon instantiated a new relationship between paper and the means by which it was manipulated that touched both the practices of ink painting and hanji in the East and postwar abstraction in the West. Employing traditional material approaches in service of a modernist vision, the artist rejected medium specificity in favor of highlighting the sculptural and architectural possibilities of paper. From his earliest work onward, Kwon saw paper as both surface and structure. He fluctuated between techniques of collage and décollage, often within the same work: layering, pressing, and sculpting it and at other times, ripping, puncturing, and saturating it. Oftentimes using his fingernails to manually scratch and tear the surface of paper from behind, his visceral treatment of paper became a driving force of his practice. Though his early work centered the complex minutiae of white tones present in hanji, Kwon’s experimentation with the paper as material and method evolved in the late 1970s once he began using monochrome tonal ink and shadows to create optical effects. Creating hair-thin incisions that often dredged into coarse tears in the paper, he would apply ink to the back, allowing it to bleed down and absorb around and through the lacerations. After his return to Korea in 1989, Kwon began to fixate on color and tone rather than structural manipulation. The artist introduced thick lines of blue, brown, and yellow pigments into his works that were made by mixing Western gouache with meok (Chinese ink). This process was a continuation of Kwon’s life-long investigation of chance creations and the collapse of hemispheric divisions. In the 2000s, Kwon incorporated geometric shapes by overlapping thin layers of almost translucent hanji on wooden panels, revealing the complexity of the white paper. Kwon’s work avoids the binary characteristics defining “Eastern” and “Western” art as much as it does the structural limitations of medium specificity. In using unconventional tools and his bare hands to experiment with the materiality of hanji, Kwon conjured a pioneering abstract vocabulary in the two-dimensional frame. In his devotion to material, the singular artist was able to slip, sublimely, into a mode of making unconcerned with vogue, even as it rendered visible the ever-flowing mutability of tradition. Kwon stated, “I do not know when the conclusion of my practice may be, but what is important to me is to keep going forward one step at a time, with commitment, and to do it continuously.” ABOUT KWON YOUNG-WOO Kwon Young-Woo (1926-2013) matriculated at Seoul National University in 1946 in the first class of the College of Fine Arts and studied oriental painting. He received his MFA, also from Seoul National University, in 1957. He taught at Chung-Ang University from 1964 to 1978 before moving to Paris, where he spent about ten years fully devoted to his studio practice. He has had solo exhibitions in major venues including Blum & Poe, New York (2016); Kukje Gallery, Seoul (2015); Seoul Museum of Art (2007); National Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art, Korea (1998); Ho-Am Art Museum, Seoul (1990); and Jacques Massol Gallery, Paris (1976). His work has also been featured in international biennials and group exhibitions, such as Korean Abstract Art: Kim Whanki and Dansaekhwa, Powerlong Museum, Shanghai (2018-19); When Process Becomes Form: Dansaekhwa and Korean Abstraction, Boghossian Foundation, Brussels (2016); the official collateral exhibition of the 56th Venice Biennale Dansaekhwa, Venice Biennale, Venice (2015); Five Korean Artists, Five Kinds of White at Tokyo Gallery (1975); the 12th Biennale de São Paulo (1973); and the 8th Tokyo Biennale (1965). His works are included in the collections of art institutions including the MMCA, Korea; Seoul Museum of Art, Korea; Leeum, Samsung Museum of Art, Seoul, Korea; the British Museum, London, UK; and Centre Pompidou, Paris, France.

Leo Amino (1911-1989), Minoru Niizuma (1930-1998), John Pai (b. 1937)

The Unseen Professors



November 18, 2021 - January 29, 2022
Curated by John Yau, the exhibition, The Unseen Professors: Leo Amino (1911-1989), Minoru Niizuma (1930-1998), John Pai (b. 1937), focuses on the sculptures of Leo Amino, Minoru Niizuma, and John Pai, three Asian artists who were born in Taiwan, Japan, and Korea between 1911 and 1937, and immigrated to America. Eventually, all of them moved to New York City, where they worked and taught for many years in leading institutions, such as Cooper Union, Pratt Institute, and Columbia University. In fact, despite belonging to different generations, their teaching careers overlapped for more than decade (1964-77), during which time a generation of artists associated with Minimalism and site-specific art gained much of the art world’s attention.

Kim Tschang-Yeul (1929-2021)

The Stillness of Water



September 9, 2021 - October 16, 2021

Ha Chong-Hyun

Return to Color



May 8, 2021 - June 30, 2021
“An artist should constantly grapple with color. And I thought I would be able to finally complete the puzzle of my art world when I fill in the missing color.” – Ha Chong-Hyun Tina Kim Gallery is pleased to present Return to Color, a solo exhibition of works by Ha Chong-Hyun (b. 1935), one of the leading members of the Dansaekhwa movement. Ha Chong-Hyun began his Conjunction series in the 1970s and has developed the techniques into a signature style. The word “Conjunction” denotes the physical connection between two significant elements of his practice, his methods and his materials, and how the two are ‘conjoined.’ He started to use burlap in replacement of the more traditional canvas popular after the Korean War. It allows him to approach each painting from the reverse, pushing thick paint through the loose weave. The oil paint then emerges from the front, creating a texture that has become iconic to Ha’s practice. In 2011, Ha moved away from his traditional oeuvre, engaging in an experimental series called Post-Conjunction, which reflects a pivotal change in his artistic philosophy. Unlike the original Conjunction series, Ha utilized an array of colors in creating Post-Conjunction works, a dynamic shift from his otherwise stalwart usage of monochrome. This series would go on to inform his new Conjunction works constructed in the last decade that contain hybridized properties of post and original. Marking his third solo presentation with the gallery, the exhibition surveys the last decade of the artist’s practice with new polychromatic works that illuminate a return to color as well as a departure from his foundational, monochromatic Conjunction series first developed in the 1970s. The exhibition will be on view from May 8 to June 30 2021.