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257 Bowery
New York, NY 10002
By Appointment
212 999 7337
Sperone Westwater Fischer was founded in 1975, when Italian art dealer Gian Enzo Sperone, Angela Westwater, and German art dealer Konrad Fischer opened a space at 142 Greene Street in SoHo, New York. (The gallery's name was changed to Sperone Westwater in 1982.) An additional space was later established at 121 Greene Street. The founders' original program showcased a European avant-garde alongside a core group of American artists to whom its founders were committed. Notable early exhibitions include a 1977 show of minimalist works by Carl Andre, Dan Flavin, Donald Judd, and Sol Lewitt; seven of Bruce Nauman's seminal early shows; eleven Richard Long exhibitions; and the installation of one of Mario Merz's celebrated glass and neon igloos in 1979 -- part of the gallery's ongoing dedication to Arte Povera artists, including Alighiero Boetti. Other early historical exhibitions at the Greene Street space include a 1989 group show, "Early Conceptual Works," which featured the work of On Kawara, Bruce Nauman, Alighiero Boetti, and Joseph Kosuth, among others; a 1999 Fontana exhibition titled "Gold: Gothic Masters and Lucio Fontana"; and selected presentations of work by Piero Manzoni. From May 2002 to May 2010, the gallery was located at 415 West 13 Street, in a 10,000-square foot space in the Meatpacking District.

In September 2010, Sperone Westwater inaugurated a new Foster + Partners designed building at 257 Bowery in New York. Today, over 45 years after its conception, the gallery continues to exhibit an international roster of prominent artists working in a wide variety of media.
Artists Represented:
Carla Accardi
Bertozzi & Casoni
Joana Choumali
Alighiero Boetti
Wim Delvoye
Braco Dimitrijevic
Kim Dingle
Lucio Fontana
Shaunté Gates
Jitish Kallat
Guillermo Kuitca
Wolfgang Laib
Helmut Lang
Amy Lincoln
Richard Long
Emil Lukas
David Lynch
Heinz Mack
Piero Manzoni
Mario Merz
Frank Moore
Katy Moran
Malcolm Morley
Bruce Nauman
Otto Piene
Alexis Rockman
Susan Rothenberg
Tom Sachs
Julian Schnabel
Andrew Sendor
Not Vital
William Wegman
Jan Worst
Works Available By:
Arman
Ali Banisadr
Greg Colson
Anh Duong
Charles LeDray
Nabil Nahas
Mimmo Paladino
Richard Tuttle
Andy Warhol

 

 
Sperone Westwater 257 Bowery, New York, NY © Nigel Young / Foster + Partners


 
Past Exhibitions

Joana Choumali

IT STILL FEELS LIKE THE RIGHT TIME



March 17, 2022 - April 30, 2022
Sperone Westwater is pleased to present Joana Choumali’s first solo exhibition at the gallery, IT STILL FEELS LIKE THE RIGHT TIME, featuring photographic works from the acclaimed series “Ça Va Aller” (2016-2019) as well as new works from “Alba’hian,” an ongoing series begun in 2018.

Bruce Nauman

His Mark



January 13, 2022 - March 12, 2022
Sperone Westwater is pleased to present His Mark, a new six-channel 3-D video installation by Bruce Nauman, his fourteenth show at the gallery since his first in 1976. Nauman drew inspiration for this new artwork from a history textbook, a gift from his grandson Milo, which contained a copy of a treaty signed by the Canadian government, representing the Queen of England, and the Native American chief of the Blackfoot Band. “The Canadian representative signed their name,” explains Nauman, “but the chief just made a mark,” signing his name as an X. Later, when signing legal documents of his own, Nauman found himself in a moment of revelation. “Why can't I just have a mark?” he exclaimed. “So I've been making all these videotapes of my fingers and hands signing Xs. I owe it all to my grandson.” Installed over three floors of the gallery, His Mark consists of six 3-D projections, each 114 x 203 inches, of the artist’s hands tracing the shape of an X on a table. Each projection presents differing combinations of Nauman’s left and right hands, singly and together, moving in and out of the frame. Alterations and permutations transform the image—in some cases, the artist’s hands are duplicated or repeated; in others, the image is manipulated by means of splitting, reversal, stacking and color change. Constant is the repetition of gesture—the action of marking an X—which Nauman transforms from a seemingly simple movement into an ambiguous, increasingly complex visual language both abstract and concrete. His Mark probes the relationship between perception and reality, evidence and illusion. Consistent in Nauman’s practice is the use of his body, specifically his hands, which recur in his work in drawings, photographs, neons and other media, as well as video. He creates physical experiences which cause us to confront our own identity and the ambiguity of our engagement with the world. Nauman is the subject of two concurrent international exhibitions. A comprehensive survey organized by Tate Modern, curated by Andrea Lissoni and Nicholas Serota, continues its tour after Tate Modern, London (2020) and Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam (2021) to M Woods, Beijing, (2022) and Pirelli HangarBicocca, Milan (2022-23). “Bruce Nauman: Contrapposto Studies,” curated by Carlos Basualdo, Philadelphia Museum of Art, and Caroline Bourgeois, Pinault Collection, opened at Punta della Dogana, Venice last May and has been extended until 27 November 2022. Both are accompanied by publications. Born in Fort Wayne, Indiana in 1941, Bruce Nauman received his BS from the University of Wisconsin, Madison (1964) and his MFA from the University of California, Davis (1966). Nauman is widely regarded as among the most important living American artists and as a catalyst for the shift in international artistic practice toward conceptual and performative uses of language and the body. Since his first solo gallery show in 1966, Nauman has been the subject of many notable museum exhibitions, including a survey organized by the Los Angeles County Museum of Art and the Whitney Museum of American Art (1972-73) and a survey at the Whitechapel Art Gallery, London in collaboration with the Kunsthalle Basel and the Musée d’Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris (1986-87). A major retrospective, co-organized by The Walker Art Center and the Hirshhorn Museum, opened at the Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofia, Madrid, and travelled to the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles; The Museum of Modern Art, New York; and Kunsthaus Zurich (1993-95). Other important solo exhibitions include “Raw Materials,” commissioned for Tate Modern’s Turbine Hall (2004); “A Rose Has No Teeth: Bruce Nauman in the 1960s” at the Berkeley Art Museum, Castello di Rivoli, and Menil Collection (2007-08); and “Bruce Nauman” at the Fondation Cartier (2015). “Bruce Nauman: Disappearing Acts,” a comprehensive retrospective, debuted at Schaulager, Basel (2018) and traveled to The Museum of Modern Art, New York and MoMA P.S.1 (2018-19). In 2020, Tate presented a survey that traveled to the Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam the following year. The exhibition continues at M Woods, Beijing, opening 11 March 2022, before concluding at Pirelli HangarBicocca, Milan (2022-23). In May 2021, Palazzo Grassi – Punta della Dogana opened “Bruce Nauman: Contrapposto Studies,” which will be on view until 27 November 2022. Nauman received the Wolf Foundation Prize in Arts in 1993, the Wexner Prize in 1994, the Golden Lion at the 48th Venice Biennale in 1999, and the Praemium Imperiale in 2004 in Japan. Nauman represented the United States at the 2009 Venice Biennale; the pavilion was awarded the Golden Lion for Best National Participation. Nauman was the 2014 laureate of the Austrian Frederick Kiesler Prize. Since his first exhibition at Sperone Westwater in 1976, Nauman has exhibited regularly at the gallery (1982, 1984, 1988, 1989, 1990, 1996, 2002, 2008, 2010, 2013, 2016, 2020 and 2022).

Jitish Kallat

Tmesis



November 4, 2021 - October 18, 2021
Sperone Westwater is delighted to present Jitish Kallat’s second solo exhibition at the gallery. Entitled Tmesis, the exhibition links artistic, historical and scientific inquiries, interlacing the immediate and the cosmic, the telescopic and the microscopic, the past and present. The main gallery features new double-sided, multi-scopic photo works titled Epicycles, 2020-21, begun during the pandemic as an intimate journal of hand-drawn notations; a ledger of seemingly incidental changes documented by the artist in his studio. Gradually these developed into large, layered photo works that weave together markers of change–a fallen stem, a crack in the wall or an abstraction beneath a chair. Kallat combines these familiar images with photographs drawn from the historic 1955 MoMA exhibition “The Family of Man,” which brought together hundreds of images from photographers around the world in the decade following World War II. Coalescing Kallat’s studio images with a glimpse of humanity from a distant time and place ultimately yields a composite portrait of time and transience. These meticulously produced lenticular images create an illusion of depth, further illuminating the notion of impermanence as images alternately appear and disappear while one circumnavigates each Epicycle. The verso of each work reveals images culled from the artist’s Integer Study drawings, installed nearby. Over the past year, Kallat has been exploring the planetary present through daily algorithmic counts of the world population. In this series, Integer Study (drawing from life), each drawing displays a timestamp of a specific moment of the day, appearing alongside three sets of freighted numbers–integers that algorithmically estimate the human population of the planet a given moment, along with the estimated births and deaths that have occurred up until that specific time of day. With intricate graphite and aquarelle pencil markings and gesso stains, Kallat’s painterly abstraction contrasts with precise data, forming a triangulation of life by mapping birth, death and time. Creating one drawing per day, the Integer Studies probe an arc of existential questions that morph into ecological ones, from reflections on climate change and extinction to evolution and decay. Kallat’s new series of paintings, Asymptote, is featured prominently on the second floor gallery. Referencing asymptotic lines—when a curve and a line approach one another but never touch— these paintings attempt to embrace complex themes at a tangent, developing an adjacency without ever intersecting. In each painting, a hand-drawn graph lies beneath metaphoric imagery—improvisatory and speculative abstractions that provide a field for the artist to mine his intuitions. Drawing from a wide range of interdisciplinary inspirations, the works assemble signs, exploratory impulses and ruminations, all of which evoke botanical, suboceanic, celestial and geological formations that coalesce to reveal the signatures of growth, evolution and entropy. Jitish Kallat was born in Mumbai in 1974 where he currently lives and works. He has been the subject of numerous solo exhibitions, including Norrtalje Konsthall, Sweden (2021); the Frist Art Museum, Nashville (2020); The National Gallery of Modern Art, New Delhi (2017); Philadelphia Museum of Art (2016-17); Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney (2015); Ian Potter Museum of Art, Melbourne (2012); the Bhau Daji Lad Museum, Mumbai (2011); the Art Institute of Chicago (2010-11); and Haunch of Venison, London (2010). In 2014, Kallat was the curator and artistic director of Kochi-Muziris Biennale 2014. His work Covering Letter featured prominently in the Indian Pavilion at the 2019 Venice Biennale. His work is owned by public and private collections worldwide, including the Art Institute of Chicago; Brooklyn Museum, New York; Centre Pompidou, Paris; Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles; M+ Collection, Hong Kong; National Gallery of Modern Art, New Delhi; Philadelphia Museum of Art; Vanhaerents Art Collection, Brussels; and the Victoria and Albert Museum, London.

Shaunté Gates

The Land of Myth: Poppies & Parachutes



November 4, 2021 - December 18, 2021
Sperone Westwater is pleased to present Shaunté Gates’s first exhibition at the gallery showcasing the artist’s new series “The Land of Myth.” Featuring mixed media paintings, Gates’s show is a psychogeographical interrogation of the issues that shape our identities. Through a multidisciplinary approach, Gates layers photography, painting, found texts, collage and family portraits, creating dreamlike landscapes that explore the labyrinthine social constructs of race, class and the physical sites people inhabit and operate within. Born in Washington, D.C., Gates uses the architecture of the city’s public housing projects as a starting point for each work, building complex compositions that weave together layers of world history, personal memories, American pop culture and mythology. Growing up in and around public housing projects in the 1980s, Gates recalls close-knit communities filled with love and support during a time of political and economic neglect. Utilizing images of D.C.’s Barry Farms, Langston Terrace and Lincoln Heights, Gates presents these housing projects as “semi-ruined temples,” which have been affected by the explosion of crack cocaine, the war on drugs and the subsequent devastation wrought on Black bodies and the futures housed within them. By building layers of photos, text fabrics, and paint, Gates’s interventions with collage transform the terrain of the housing project into cinematic compositions of beauty, chaos and glory, wherein the past, present and future–imagined and real–collide and coalesce. Interwoven into these complex landscapes are photographs of the artist’s friends and family that have been transfigured into animal-like forms and other mythological creatures, appearing both ancient and futuristic. Gates surveys themes of duality, religion, introspection and escapism as the figures navigate the maze of norms and narrative placed upon them by outside forces through policy, history and mass media. Titled after Joseph Campbell’s “The Power of Myth”—a 1988 documentary series exploring residential segregation and the many myths derived from the constructs of education, race and class—this body of work further investigates the intersection of psychology and geography, revealing forgotten, discarded and marginalized aspects of the urban environment. Shaunté Gates (b. 1979) lives and works in Washington, D.C.. He studied at Duke Ellington School of the Arts and Bowie State University. Gates is trained in oil painting and produced representational portraits early in his career. His recent work across mixed media collage and video uses found materials to subvert landscapes with architecture embedded with cultural symbologies and caste categorizations, probing our psychological experiences of the city and illuminating forgotten, discarded or marginalized aspects of the urban environment. Gates is a participating artist in the Smithsonian Institution’s “Men of Change” four-year traveling exhibition spanning ten museums, including California African American Museum, Cincinnati Underground Railroad Museum and Washington State History Museum (2019-2022). His work has also been featured extensively in exhibitions in the Washington region, including STABLE (2021); American University Museum at the Katzen Arts Center (2016); Honfluer Gallery (2015); 39th Street Gallery (2014); Parish Gallery (2011); The Graham Collection (2006); and Howard University (2004). He has been awarded residencies with The Kennedy Center and Washington Project for the Arts (WPA). Gates has work in esteemed private collections and institutions such as the Studio Museum in Harlem. He has completed many public art commissions throughout D.C. schools, including Transcending, a painting commemorating the 140th anniversary of Howard University School of Law

Bertozzi & Casoni

The Five Seasons



September 9, 2021 - October 30, 2021
Sperone Westwater is pleased to present an exhibition of ceramic sculptures by the Italian artists Bertozzi & Casoni, featuring their new series, The Five Seasons, a reconstruction of the paintings by the late Renaissance master Giuseppe Arcimboldo. In his late 16th century portraits, Arcimboldo represents each season - Winter, Spring, Summer and Fall – through a human face rendered out of plants, fruits and vegetables. Bertozzi & Casoni’s work is not simply a transliteration of painting into sculpture, but rather their own interpretation of Arcimboldo’s prompt. The face of Winter (Inverno) is wrought out of gnarled tree bark and barren branches, Spring (Primavera) out of delicate flowers and vibrant leaves, Summer (Estate) boasts glistening vegetation and for the face of Fall (Autunno), a cornucopia of the harvest’s bounties. Quinta Stagione, a sculpture of a fifth season of their creation, offers an allusion to Arcimboldo’s Four Seasons in One Head, perhaps “a self-portrait of the artist in the ‘winter’ of his life, [or] a summa of his career.” The ceramic extension cords, rusted cans and flexible PVC tubing that make up Quinta Stagione sit in juxtaposition to the artists’ abounding representations of the four conventional seasons. New handbag and tray sculptures will be installed on the second floor. The handbag has long served as one of the most ubiquitous symbols of luxury and status within the world of women’s fashion. Bertozzi & Casoni’s designer line of purses, many of which are titled after influential women in media and the contemporary art scene, sit open and abandoned to reveal their contents – guns, cigarettes, sunglasses and pill bottles. These handbags lie at the intersection of surrealism and hyperrealism – placing the absurd within the ordinary to call into question our notions of luxury, consumerism and femininity. While the trays – teeming with broken eggshells, silverware and newspapers – typify the technical prowess of Bertozzi & Casoni’s practice, they once again capture the artists’ fascination with the underside of consumption – with the idea that, though “the rubbish you find in the street is ugly, [when] you remove the smell, it becomes beautiful.” Since the beginning of their career, Bertozzi & Casoni saw in pottery the opportunity to revitalize an artform. Their approach to ceramics is characterized by hyper-realistic recreations of real-life objects. In this mimetic ceramic form, their objects make permanent what we perceive to be the transient markers of our existence – a luxury handbag or a broken eggshell. Their work simultaneously creates illusions and shatters them – forcing you to realize that the objects they present before you are, despite their realism, made of ceramic, and in the wake of that realization, to question your perception of the object itself. Giampaolo Bertozzi, born in Borgo Tossignano in 1957, and Stefano Dal Monte Casoni, born in Lugo di Romagna in 1961, met as students at the Gaetano Ballardini Ceramic Art Institute in Faenza, Italy. Their work was featured in the Italian Pavilion at the Venice Biennale in 2009 and 2011. Solo museum exhibitions include a survey at Castello Sforzesco and Museo Internazionale delle Ceramiche in Faenza (2008-09), a solo show at Fondazione Museo Pino Pascali, Polignano a Mare, Italy (2011-12); and “Bertozzi & Casoni: Timeless” at the Museum Beelden aan Zee, Den Haag, The Netherlands (2013). Recent solo museum exhibitions include MAMbo, Museo d’Arte Moderna, Bologna (2015-16); Palazzo Poggi, Bologna (2017); Museo MARCA, Catanzaro (2019); and Museo Morandi, Bologna (2019-20). In 2017, Museo Bertozzi & Casoni, a permanent exhibition space devoted to their work, opened at the Cavallerizza Ducale in Sassuolo, Italy. Bertozzi & Casoni currently live and work in Imola, Italy. This will be their third solo show at Sperone Westwater, New York, preceded by one in 2005 and in 2015.

Amy Lincoln



September 9, 2021 - October 30, 2021
Sperone Westwater is pleased to present an exhibition of ten new paintings by Amy Lincoln, the artist’s first show at the gallery since she joined the roster in July. In this series of imaginary seascapes, Lincoln invents new subject matter, painting intensely hued ocean waves, rays of sunlight, tumultuous clouds and starry nights—a departure from the landscapes central to her early work. Recalling her upbringing in Oregon, where beach visits under overcast skies were frequent, Lincoln’s new panels explore the phenomena of light reflection and refraction. Lincoln paints simplified forms of atmospheric elements—air, water, light and clouds—which, given their lack of local color or concrete form, can change according to the environment. In the case of the seascape, Lincoln’s palette assumes a prominent role as the perceived color of each vista adapts to certain conditions such as dawn or dusk, rain or sunshine. Lincoln’s paintings are expansive. She intricately covers every inch of the panel, developing a clear perspective of ground, horizon and sky through her careful attention to color and composition. Working in acrylic, Lincoln systematically layers bands of color that transition from light to dark, implying the illusion of space. In paintings like Ursa Major (Mauve Waves) and Sunset with Stars, the ocean’s waves are pared down into undulating ripples of lilac, pink or blue, implying the constant movement of the ocean as it seemingly changes color under the sky. Lincoln explains, “I think of the space of a painting almost like a stage set. Sometimes the clouds stand in for curtains. I imagine the water as appearing in rows moving in opposite directions.” Lincoln’s affinity for creating spatial perspective is further demonstrated by her handling of the sky. While Lincoln’s clouds often feel sculptural, stars are rendered flat like an icon or symbol, often placed in concentric circles of color, creating a glowing effect. In both paintings, the subtle, near monochromatic palettes possess an ethereal, emotional quality, implying the feeling of peace and calm right before dusk. Other paintings depict sunnier skies, including Sun with Rainbow Rays (Light) and Sun with Rainbow Rays (Dark), in which rays of the sun are splayed out in a pinwheel of vivid, colorful lines. The foregrounded rays provide a sense of three-dimensionality, and their prismatic colors seem to jump off the panel in contrast to the flatter, monochromatic patterns of the sky and ocean. Amy Lincoln lives and works in New York city. She completed her MFA in Painting at Temple University’s Tyler School of Art in 2006 and her BA in Studio Art at University of California, Davis in 2003. Lincoln’s work has been the subject of solo exhibitions at Morgan Lehman Gallery, New York (2018; 2016) and Monya Rowe Gallery, Saint Augustine, FL (2016), among others. In March 2021, Taymour Grahne Projects, London, presented a virtual exhibition of Lincoln’s paintings of seascapes. Her work has also been featured in numerous group exhibitions at galleries in New York including Sargent’s Daughters (2018), Regina Rex (2017), Norte Maar (2012; 2010; 2009), and Thierry Goldberg (2009), as well as internationally at Galerie Valerie Bach, Brussels, Belgium (2020) and Artual Gallery, Beirut, Lebanon (2019). Lincoln has been awarded residencies at the Wave Hill Winter Workspace program, the Inside Out Art Museum Residency in Beijing, and a Swing Space residency from the Lower Manhattan Cultural Council.

Group Show

WOOD WORKS: Raw, Cut, Carved, Covered



June 4, 2021 - August 27, 2021
Sperone Westwater is pleased to present WOOD WORKS: Raw, Cut, Carved, Covered, a diverse exhibition showcasing innovative uses of wood in contemporary art, featuring works by Carla Accardi, Carl Andre, Richard Artschwager, Abraham Cruzvillegas, Kim Dingle, Michele Oka Doner, Rico Gatson, Helmut Lang, Richard Long, Emil Lukas, David Lynch, Katy Moran, Paulo Nazareth, Noah Purifoy, Brent Owens, Tom Sachs, Andrew Sendor, Jean Tinguely, Richard Tuttle and William Wegman. Wood is one of the oldest and most common materials with a long history that reflects the diversity and evolution of human civilization. A sustainable, structural material, wood has been integral to the development of every culture around the world, used to make ancient ritual objects such as ­talismans and coffins, prehistoric weaponry and tools for hunting like spears and fishhooks, aspects of rudimentary machinery like wheels and boats, as well as structures for shelter, scaffolding, and home furnishings. In recent years, artists have employed a variety of conceptual and technical approaches to the medium, sometimes choosing wood for its structural properties and other times for its ecological and temporal connotations. Considering the past year’s challenges— the global pandemic and the restructuring of daily life— the transformation of common materials into new forms has become more meaningful than ever. The exhibition features several works of assemblage constructed from a diverse range of available things, ranging from junk materials to urban debris, found items and simple motors. In the East gallery, Tom Sachs’ epic sculpture The Cabinet (2014) epitomizes the bricoleur’s practice—here, Sachs creates replicas of wooden ConEdison barriers to construct a wall-mounted wunderkammern, filled with hundreds of weapons and tools inscribed with the name of someone who inspired him, referencing celebrities, musicians, and architects such as Le Corbusier, Norman Foster, Buckminster Fuller and Renzo Piano. On the second floor, Richard Tuttle’s Source of Imagery, 1, (Don Giovanni) (1994) draws beauty and poetry out of humble materials, employing painted and raw plywood, a wooden block, plastic tubing, and a bottle brush. Abraham Cruzvillegas’ Untitled (Portable Opener) (2002) uses a cross section of a tree, pointing to what the artist calls “autoconstruction” or self-building—creating through improvisation with whatever materials are at hand. In this case, he mounts a metal John Deere bottle opener on the tree fragment. Conversely, Helmut Lang’s Untitled (2021) consists of a wood panel from which bottle caps were removed, making distinctive imprints on the enamel and resin coating. In Jean Tinguely’s kinetic sculpture, Soleil Noir (1963), light plywood is juxtaposed with a heavy iron plate and electric motorized metal wheel, suggesting the tension that exists between the human hand and technology. In some cases, these diverse objects carry powerful political connotations. Noah Purifoy, whose Pavilion 1 (1988) is featured on the first floor, dedicated himself to the found object, using art as a tool for social change following the momentous 1965 Watts Riot in South Los Angeles. Making use of debris from the riots, as well as scraps of wicker, fragments of furniture, wooden beads and blocks, Purifoy’s lexicon demonstrates the desire to work with or find beauty in what has been discarded, constructing sculptures part-by-part, taking inspiration from Central African sculpture, Dada, and the history of jazz. In the East gallery, Paulo Nazareth’s Sem titulo, da serie Produtos de Genocidio (2013) places two bottles of bleach and fabric dye inside a resin box atop wood reminiscent of street market stalls. Nazareth’s series Produtos de Genocidio examines products which use names from indigenous cultures. In this case, the use of bleach and dye—to whiten or darken— is a painful reminder of the psychological burdens imposed by institutionalized racism. The violence suggested by these works is recast in Kim Dingle’s Priss (1995), in which two toddlers, pintsize sculptures of the artist and her partner dressed in their Sunday best, run amok in a wooden crib. Among the classic artists in the show, Richard Long utilizes 285 irregular pieces of wood, gathered from the Quantock Hills in Somerset, England, near his hometown in Bristol, to create Quantock Wood Circle (1981). Carl Andre, by contrast, uses identical elements which stand and hold together by their own mass. In Nixes Mate (1992), Andre utilizes eight Western Red Cedar timbers, measuring 12 x 12 x 36 inches, the standard size for his sculptures of uncarved blocks. Carla Accardi’s Verde (1974) utilizes wooden stretcher bars which remain visible under sicofoil, a pliable and transparent industrial plastic, rather than canvas. Of the more recent works in the show, Michele Oka Doner’s Totem (2007/2015) again transforms found material—the branches, bark, and roots of a tree—into a totemic sculpture held together by archival wax, suggesting the abstracted form of an ancient caryatid. Such veneration is also present in Rico Gatson’s Throne III (2016), a regal high-back chair meant to memorialize the passing of significant people in the artist’s life. Throne III is emblazoned with vivid geometric ornamentation, using a vibrant Pan-African palate on wood, also present in his abstract Panel Paintings (2014-2021).

John Giorno



March 25, 2021 - May 28, 2021
Sperone Westwater is pleased to present the first posthumous exhibition of John Giorno (1936-2019), opening on 25 March 2021 and extending through 28 May 2021. This solo marks the late artist’s second show with the gallery, following “John Giorno: DO THE UNDONE” in the Fall of 2019. The opening will take place from 12 to 7 PM on 25 March. Giorno’s black-and-white paintings, dating from 2011-2018 and measuring 48x48 inches, are installed as a grid in the main gallery. Executed in the trademark font Mark Michaelson developed for the artist in 1984, these twelve screen-printed works incorporate phrases from Giorno’s distinctive poetry, such as IT DOESN’T GET BETTER, THANX 4 NOTHING and GOD IS MAN MADE. In the East gallery, a collaborative audio-visual new media installation created by John Giorno with his husband, the artist Ugo Rondinone, beckons afar, seen but not heard in the distance from the gallery’s Bowery entrance. Inside the intimate skylight room, a multimedia work entitled John Giorno Performing I Don’t Need it, I don’t want it, and You Cheated Me Out of It, 1981 & Eating the Sky, 1978 reveals itself in the round on double sided flat screen monitors. The work unifies the visual with a corresponding audio track of the artist’s performative reading, coinciding and timed with the visual changes in words on the screen. Transforming from positive to negative and back again in the two-sided frame, the installation becomes visual, sensual and auditory in one complete experience. Eating the Sky, 1978, is a landmark work that references American politics in a period in which the so-called “culture wars” were just beginning. It was also created in the year in which Giorno convened a gathering of the downtown New York art world to celebrate in readings, performances, and song, including contributions from William S. Burroughs. Dubbed “The Nova Convention,” this multi-day festival featured performances by Burroughs, Brian Gysin, Allen Ginsberg, Patti Smith, Laurie Anderson and many other luminaries of the avant-garde. The second floor of the gallery will showcase Giorno’s rare individual works which were not a part of a specific series, but function on their own. These 48x48 inch canvases incorporate a hybrid of visual strategies both in the black and white and with colored lettering. Each features a classic phrase from one of his key poems, such as SIT IN MY HEART AND SMILE and YOU GOT TO BURN TO SHINE. John Giorno (1936-2019) is recognized as one of the most innovative poets and artists of the 20th Century. His kaleidoscopic work fused and furthered poetry, visual art and activism, pushing text off the printed page and into the social realm. Giorno’s The New York Times obituary concluded: “Mr. Giorno’s lasting contribution to art came through his restless experiments in the circulation and political potential of poetry, which he felt had been unjustly overshadowed by other genres of expression.” Giorno’s interdisciplinary roles as a political activist, Tibetan Buddhist and performance artist culminated in a burst of creativity in the second half of his artistic career. From 1995-2019, the artist produced an impressive body of visual art in the medium of painting, sculpture and works on paper, critically acclaimed and exhibited by leading galleries and museums worldwide. Giorno’s work is in the collection of The Museum of Modern Art, New York, Centre Georges Pompidou in Paris, SF MOMA, Columbus Museum of Art, and other institutions internationally, as well as in private collections around the world. Giorno’s autobiography, Great Demon Kings: A Memoir of Poetry, Sex, Death and Enlightenment, 25 years in the making, was published in August 2020 by Farrar, Straus & Giroux. A paperback version will be published in August 2021.

Richard Long

MUDDY HEAVEN



April 1, 2020 - May 31, 2020

Susan Rothenberg



January 9, 2020 - February 29, 2020
Sperone Westwater is pleased to present eight new paintings and six works on paper by Susan Rothenberg for the artist’s twelfth solo show at the gallery. Inspired by the artist’s surroundings in New Mexico, the animals and birds in these new works – pack rats, doves, and ravens – are caught in intense, fleeting moments. Rothenberg’s brushstrokes convey urgency and movement while building images that not only charge abstraction with representation but also confound figure and ground. These new works signal that she continues to be an independent figure, reimagining painting at a time when a new generation of artists is vitally taking up the question. Susan Rothenberg’s first New York solo in 1975 took place at 112 Greene Street, an alternative space in SoHo. It consisted of three large paintings of horses. Almost 20 years later Peter Schjeldahl, when writing about Rothenberg’s 1993 Albright-Knox retrospective, called that 1975 exhibition, a “eureka” moment because, for him and some artists, it brought painting back from the dead. He described the critical significance of those paintings as having “introduced symbolic imagery into Minimalist abstraction” and characterized them as having “powerful vulnerability or vulnerable power” simultaneously. Early on, her practice encouraged many other female artists, who continue to regard her with admiration and gratitude. For example, Amy Sillman selected Rothenberg’s 1977 Untitled work on paper for her current curated show at MoMA, “Artist’s Choice: Amy Sillman – The Shape of Shape.” Susan Rothenberg has had numerous exhibitions in the United States and abroad, including early solos at Kunsthalle, Basel (1981-82), the Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam (1982) and an exhibition organized by the Los Angeles County Museum of Art that traveled to seven institutions in the US and abroad (1983-85); a retrospective organized by the Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo that traveled to the Hirshhorn Museum, the Saint Louis Art Museum, Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago, Seattle Art Museum and the Dallas Museum of Art (1992-94); a survey at the Museo de Arte Contemporáneo in Monterrey, Mexico (1996-97); “Susan Rothenberg: Paintings from the Nineties” at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston (1999); and an exhibition of drawings and prints at the Herbert F. Johnson Museum of Art at Cornell University that traveled to the Contemporary Museum, Honolulu and the Museum of Fine Arts, Santa Fe (1998-99). A survey, “Moving in Place,” was organized by Michael Auping at the Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth, and traveled to the Georgia O’Keeffe Museum, Santa Fe and the Miami Art Museum (2009-11). Her work can be found in important public and private collections, including Albright-Knox Art Gallery; the Hall Collection; Hirshhorn Museum; Los Angeles County Museum of Art; The Metropolitan Museum of Art; Museum of Fine Arts, Houston; The Museum of Modern Art, New York; National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.; Stedelijk Museum; Tate, London; Walker Art Center, Minneapolis; and Whitney Museum, New York. In 1987, Rothenberg had her first solo at Sperone Westwater, where she exhibits regularly (1990, 1992, 1994, 1997, 2002, 2004, 2006, 2009, 2011, and 2016).

David Lynch

Squeaky Flies in the Mud



November 1, 2019 - December 21, 2019
Sperone Westwater is pleased to present an exhibition of new work by artist and filmmaker David Lynch, his first with the gallery. The show will feature paintings, works on paper, watercolors, lamp sculptures and furniture. Lynch’s five-decade career includes an extensive range of art-making— painting, drawing, photography, printmaking, sculpture, music and film. While studying at the Boston Museum School and the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts (PAFA) in the late 1960s, Lynch envisioned his first ‘moving painting’; a multidimensional painting beneath a moving projection titled Six Men Getting Sick (Six Times) (1967). This multimedia work marked Lynch’s first foray into video and filmmaking. Since that time, his prolific career has touched on subjects of the organic body and industrial sites in various states of decay, describing a deeper human experience both beyond and within the everyday. Often depicting these scenes with a language of surrealism and mystery, Lynch’s work balances at the porous divide between the body and the world it inhabits. Lynch has been the subject of numerous solo exhibitions, including, most recently, a survey at HOME, Manchester (2019). Retrospectives include “Someone is in my House” at the Bonnefantenmuseum, Maastricht (2018-19), “Silence and Dynamism” at the Centre of Contemporary Art, Torun, Poland (2017-18), “Between Two Worlds” at the Queensland Art Gallery in Brisbane, Australia (2015), and “The Air is on Fire” at the Fondation Cartier, Paris (2007). In 2014-15, a survey was presented at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts (PAFA) where he studied. In 2013-14, Brett Littman curated a thematic selection of works utlizing “naming” through narrative text at Kayne Griffin Corcoran, Los Angeles, which traveled to the Middlesbrough Institute of Modern Art (2014-15). Other earlier important solos included “David Lynch: The Factory Photographs” at the Photographers’ Gallery, London (2014), the GL Strand in Copenhagen (2010-11), and the Garage Center for Contemporary Culture in Moscow (2009). Born in Missoula, Montana, David Lynch now lives and works in Los Angeles. Lynch is also known as a filmmaker and recording artist who over the past three decades has written and directed critically acclaimed films such as Eraserhead (1977), The Elephant Man (1980), Blue Velvet (1986), Lost Highway (1997), Mulholland Drive (2001), Inland Empire (2006) and the television series Twin Peaks (1990-91). He is also represented by Kayne Griffin Corcoran in Los Angeles.

John Giorno

DO THE UNDONE



September 5, 2019 - October 26, 2019

Andy Warhol

By Hand: Part II, Drawings 1950s – 1960s



April 25, 2019 - July 19, 2019

Katy Moran

I want to live in the afternoon of that day



March 1, 2019 - April 13, 2019

Emil Lukas



January 9, 2019 - February 23, 2019

Peter Halley

Unseen Paintings 1997 – 2002, From the Collection of Gian Enzo Sperone



November 2, 2018 - December 22, 2018

Malcolm Morley

Tally-ho



September 12, 2018 - October 27, 2018

Michael Landy

Summer Sale



June 27, 2018 - August 3, 2018

Alexis Rockman

New Mexico Field Drawings



June 21, 2018 - August 3, 2018

Jitish Kallat



April 26, 2018 - June 16, 2018

Wolfgang Laib

Where the Land and Water End



March 9, 2018 - April 21, 2018

Kim Dingle



January 10, 2018 - March 3, 2018