Skip to main content
6750 Santa Monica Boulevard
Los Angeles, CA 90038
310 276 5424


Artists Represented:
Doug Aitken
Kader Attia
Matthew Barney
Kevin Beasley
Walead Beshty
John Bock
Abraham Cruzvillegas
Lizzie Fitch/Ryan Trecartin
Theaster Gates
Dan Graham
Rachel Harrison
Alex Hubbard
Elliott Hundley
Sergej Jensen
Anish Kapoor
Toba Khedoori
Liz Larner
Glenn Ligon
Marilyn Minter
Catherine Opie
Manfred Pernice
Raymond Pettibon
Elizabeth Peyton
Jack Pierson
Richard Prince
Daniel Richter
Willem de Rooij
Sable Elyse Smith
Wolfgang Tillmans
Ryan Trecartin
Gillian Wearing
Lawrence Weiner
James Welling
Sue Williams
Andrea Zittel

 
Current Exhibition

Daniel Richter

Furor II



November 3, 2022 - December 23, 2022
Regen Projects is pleased to present 'Furor II,' an exhibition of new paintings by German artist Daniel Richter. This marks the artist’s fifth solo presentation with the gallery. Over the last several years, Richter has taken to a process that prioritizes the gestural qualities of painting and the possibilities of the medium itself. Employing a variety of painterly techniques that fragment the figurative with emotive gestures, these bold new canvases serve as an inquiry into the very nature of painting and the process by which images are multiplied and consumed. Whereas the artist’s earlier works drew from multiple sources to form an allegory, his latest developments explore all the possible permutations that can derive from a single source using differing forms, color palettes, and textures. An opening reception will be held on Thursday, November 3 from 6:00 – 8:00 pm. For all press inquiries, please contact Elizabeth Gartner at +1 310 276 5424 or elizabeth@regenprojects.com. Image: Daniel Richter, 'Empty the apartment,' 2022. Oil on canvas, 86 5/8 x 65 inches (220 x 165 cm)

 
Past Exhibitions

Lawrence Weiner

Stars Don’t Stand Still in the Sky: A Tribute to Lawrence Weiner



September 15, 2022 - October 22, 2022
Regen Projects is pleased to present 'Stars Don’t Stand Still in the Sky: A Tribute to Lawrence Weiner.' Weiner contributed greatly to the art of our time, helping to shape contemporary expectations of what art is, how it is seen, and how it is made. This group exhibition explores the scope of this influence, presenting Weiner’s work alongside works by his contemporaries, his friends and collaborators, as well as a younger generation of artists. Weiner’s influence on the history of art, and more specifically within the pantheon of Conceptual artists of the late 1960s and early 1970s, is unquestionable. This tribute brings together works by many of the artists who shared in this generative moment—one that saw the birth of new kinds of autonomous artworks that sought to break the bond between idea and object. Works by artists such as Robert Barry, Stanley Brouwn, Daniel Buren, John Baldessari, Mel Bochner, Hanne Darboven, Joseph Kosuth, Barry Le Va, Sol LeWitt, and Dennis Oppenheim will illustrate the rich moment out of which Weiner’s signature work emerged. A pioneering figure who ushered in the dematerialization of the art object, Weiner’s commitment to the primacy of language was equally instrumental in changing the course of contemporary art. Open-ended, poetic, and profound, the statements that formed Weiner’s lexicon, and his concept of language as visual art, have become fundamental to the contemporary art vernacular. The exhibition illustrates how Weiner’s groundbreaking ideas extended far beyond the genre of Conceptual art to impact emerging movements as well as the work of subsequent generations of artists using the written word as material. Works by Charles Gaines, Jenny Holzer, Glenn Ligon, Bruce Nauman, Jack Pierson, Ed Ruscha, Sable Elyse Smith, and others will make these connections visible. Others featured in the exhibition belong to the vast, global network of friends and collaborators that Weiner fostered during his lifetime—artists such as Birgir Andrésson, Matthew Barney, Abraham Cruzvillegas, Isa Genzken, Liam Gillick, Franka Hörnschemeyer, Jacqueline Humphries, Stephen Prina, De Wain Valentine, and Christopher Williams. Finally, the show will include a display of approximately 150 publications and posters Weiner produced during his lifetime, alongside a selection of ephemera. 'Stars Don’t Stand Still in the Sky: A Tribute to Lawrence Weiner' will include works by Doug Aitken, Carl Andre, Birgir Andrésson, Art & Language, John Baldessari, Matthew Barney, Robert Barry, Kevin Beasley, Walead Beshty, Mel Bochner, John Bock, Stanley Brouwn, Daniel Buren, Alan Charlton, Abraham Cruzvillegas, Hanne Darboven, Charles Gaines, Isa Genzken, Liam Gillick, Rachel Harrison, Jenny Holzer, Franka Hörnschemeyer, Alex Hubbard, Douglas Huebler, Jacqueline Humphries, Joseph Kosuth, Liz Larner, Clarence John Laughlin, Louise Lawler, Barry Le Va, Sol LeWitt, Glenn Ligon, Lee Lozano, Gordon Matta-Clark, John McCracken, Robert Morris, Bruce Nauman, Catherine Opie, Dennis Oppenheim, Raymond Pettibon, Jack Pierson, Sigmar Polke, Stephen Prina, Robert Rauschenberg, Ed Ruscha, Sable Elyse Smith, Robert Smithson, Miroslav Tichý, Wolfgang Tillmans, De Wain Valentine, Gillian Wearing, Lawrence Weiner, James Welling, Christopher Williams, and Sue Williams. The exhibition will also include an early film by Weiner featuring Kathryn Bigelow, as well as a collaboration between Weiner and Virgil Abloh for Louis Vuitton. Ultimately, the full extent of Weiner’s influence is impossible to encapsulate, and there are countless others who could not be represented here whose work shares an affinity to Weiner’s groundbreaking ideas. Regen Projects’s debut gallery exhibition was a solo Lawrence Weiner show which opened on December 8, 1989. The gallery has done ten successive Weiner exhibitions since then and has organized this tribute to honor a great artist and friendship. Lawrence Weiner (1942 – 2021) was born in Bronx, New York. A leading figure in the development of the Conceptual art movement in the 1960s, Weiner’s seminal and singular practice used language as its core material—a distinct challenge to expectations of what an artwork is and can be. Questioning the fundamentals of sculpture and artmaking itself, Weiner shifted away from object-centric work with his 1968 precept: 1. THE ARTIST MAY CONSTRUCT THE WORK 2. THE WORK MAY BE FABRICATED 3. THE WORK NEED NOT BE BUILT EACH BEING EQUAL AND CONSISTENT WITH THE INTENT OF THE ARTIST THE DECISION AS TO CONDITION RESTS WITH THE RECEIVER UPON THE OCCASION OF RECEIVERSHIP Significant solo exhibitions of the artist’s work have been held at museums and institutions worldwide including The Jewish Museum, New York (2020–2021); MACRO—Museo d’Arte Contemporanea, Rome (2020); Fundación Casa Wabi, Puerto Escondido (2020–2021); KODE, Bergen (2019); Museo Nivola, Orani (2019); Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive (2017); Milwaukee Art Museum (2017); Kunsthaus Bregenz (2016); Blenheim Palace, Woodstock, England (2015); Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam (2013); Museu d’Art Contemporani de Barcelona (2013); Tate Modern, London (2012, 2006); Whitney Museum of American Art, New York (2007–2008), co-organized with the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles (2008); Centro de Arte Contemporáneo de Málaga (2008); Haus der Kunst, Munich (2007); Museo Tamayo, Mexico City (2004); Kunstmuseum Wolfsburg (2000); Walker Art Center, Minneapolis (1994); San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (1992); and the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington, D.C. (1990); among many others. His work has been included in Documenta 5, 6, 7, and 13 (1972, 1977, 1982, 2012); the 36th, 41st, 50th, and 55th iterations of La Biennale di Venezia (1972, 1984, 2003, 2013); and the 27th Bienal de São Paulo (2006). Weiner has received numerous awards and honors including the University of Applied Arts Vienna Oskar-Kokoschka Award (2022); Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden New York Gala Honoree (2019); Savannah College of Art and Design deFINE ART Honoree (2019); The Kitchen Spring Gala Honoree (2017); Aspen Art Museum Aspen Award For Art (2017); Wolf Foundation Wolf Prize (2017); Art Resources Transfer D.U.C. Honoree (2017); Roswitha Haftmann Foundation Roswitha Haftmann Prize (2014); Skowhegan Medal for Painting/Conceptual Art (1999); a Guggenheim Fellowship (1994); and two National Endowment for the Arts Visual Artist Fellowships (1976, 1983); among others. An opening reception will be held on Thursday, September 15 from 6:00 – 8:00 pm. For all press inquiries, please contact Elizabeth Gartner at +1 310 276 5424 or elizabeth@regenprojects.com. For all other inquiries, please contact Jennifer Loh, Stephanie Dudzinski, Bryan Barcena, or Anthony Salvador at sales@regenprojects.com. Image: Poster for Stars Don’t Stand Still In The Sky: A Tribute to Lawrence Weiner, 2022. © MOVED PICTURES, Courtesy Regen Projects

Kevin Beasley

On site



May 7, 2022 - June 25, 2022
Regen Projects is pleased to present On site, our first exhibition with Kevin Beasley. This will be Beasley’s first solo gallery show in Los Angeles. With a multidisciplinary practice that incorporates sculpture, drawing, installation, sound, music, and performance, Beasley probes the material and cultural conditions that shape our perception of history. His ability to alchemize ordinary material—specifically personal artifacts and articles of clothing—into sculptures that are simultaneously transcendent and familiar has placed him at the vanguard of artistic and cultural thought. This exhibition presents an ambitious new sound sculpture in the form of a modified utility pole that rises high into the gallery. A focal point of the exhibition, the work provides a source of light as well as sound, which emanates from a network of speakers placed throughout the space and on the rooftop. Consisting of field recordings Beasley gathered in a variety of locations, these sounds connect the experience of the work, here in its present context, to any number of potential places. A similar sculpture, first presented as part of Prospect New Orleans earlier this year, occupies a plot of land Beasley purchased in the Lower Ninth Ward. In both works, what started as a ubiquitous marker of urban infrastructure is materially altered and reimagined in terms of what such an object could be. This very act of creative reinterpretation invites unlimited possibilities and future applications. On site considers the idea of place as a powerful nexus of personal and collective experience. Taking the American South as a foundation, the exhibition draws attention to the complex network of objects, industries, and materials that become subtly and inextricably bound up in a society. With his Slab sculptures, Beasley brings unorthodox materials and processes to the millennia-old tradition of relief sculpture, thus both participating in and probing the boundaries of the Western canon. References to land in Virginia owned by the artist’s family over multiple generations provide a lens through which to consider the Black experience and its impacts on American history and culture. Made from clothing and raw cotton hardened with resin, the works combine with dye-sublimation-printed imagery significant to the artist, such as peach trees in Lynchburg, VA, where he grew up, and a pink shed on his paternal grandmother’s property in Valentines, VA. These diaphanous images merge with the textures and colors of the supporting material like double exposures, forming an evocative space wherein history, memory, and imagination intertwine. Another work takes the House of Slaves, a former slave outpost and memorial off the coast of Dakar, as a psychically potent, albeit historically contested, symbol. This and other works consider the ability of narratives to act as proxies for grief and pain, filling voids where history has been forgotten, neglected, stripped, or mistold. Kevin Beasley (b. 1985, Lynchburg, VA) earned a BFA in painting and sculpture from the College for Creative Studies in Detroit in 2007 and an MFA in sculpture from Yale University, New Haven in 2012. Recent exhibitions and curatorial projects by the artist include A body, revealed, Hill Art Foundation, New York (2022); Prospect.5: Yesterday we said tomorrow, New Orleans (2021); The Dirty South: Contemporary Art, Material Culture, and the Sonic Impulse, Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, Richmond (2021); Grief and Grievance: Art and Mourning in America, New Museum, New York (2021); ASSEMBLY, The Kitchen, New York (2019); Kevin Beasley, Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston (2018); Hammer Projects: Kevin Beasley, Hammer Museum, Los Angeles (2017); inHarlem: Kevin Beasley, The Studio Museum in Harlem, New York (2016); Storylines: Contemporary Art at the Guggenheim, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York (2015); and the Whitney Biennial, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York (2014); among others. Performances by the artist have been held at the Performa Biennial, New York (2021); A4 Arts Foundation, Cape Town, South Africa (2020); Whitney Museum of American Art, New York (2014, 2018, and 2019); Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam (2018); The Underground Museum, Los Angeles (2018); Lincoln Center, New York (2016); The Art Gallery of Ontario, Toronto (2016); The Renaissance Society at the University of Chicago (2016); The Kitchen, New York (2015); Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, (2015); The Walker Art Center, Minneapolis (2014); and the Museum of Modern Art, New York (2012); among others. Beasley’s work is included in museum collections including the Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo; Art Gallery of Ontario, Toronto; Art Institute of Chicago; Blanton Museum of Art, Austin; Columbus Museum of Art; Dallas Museum of Art; Hammer Museum, Los Angeles; Hill Art Foundation, New York; Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston; Minneapolis Institute of Art; Museum of Modern Art, New York; Pérez Art Museum Miami; San Antonio Museum of Art; San Francisco Museum of Modern Art; Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York; The Studio Museum in Harlem, New York; Tate Modern, London; and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; among others. For all press inquiries, please contact Elizabeth Gartner at +1 310 276 5424 or elizabeth@regenprojects.com. For all other inquiries, please contact Jennifer Loh, Stephanie Dudzinski, Bryan Barcena, or Anthony Salvador at sales@regenprojects.com. Image: Installation view of Kevin Beasley On site Regen Projects, Los Angeles May 7 – June 25, 2022 Photo: Paul Salveson

Sue Williams



March 5, 2022 - April 23, 2022
Regen Projects is pleased to present an exhibition of new paintings by New York-based artist Sue Williams. In her seventh solo presentation with the gallery since 1992, Williams presents a group of works in which formal ingenuity hovers at the margin of abstraction and representation. Attending CalArts in the 1970s where she studied under John Baldessari, among others, Williams broke onto the art scene in the late 1980s with abrasively political and mordantly funny paintings that combined figuration with feminist cultural critique. Her work hasundergone a number of stylistic shifts since that time, adopting a relatively abstract and lyrical approach in which bright colors and buoyant forms act as foils to darker undercurrents in her work. As curator Lionel Bovier remarks, this quality points to “the limits of what can be represented and figured out, the fringes where forms only mark the temporary organization of the chaos of the real, and where the subject is constantly threatened by the return of the repressed.” In her newest compositions, Williams achieves a delicate balance between density and sparseness, combining line-drawn figures with expressive marks and bursts of color. Radically nonhierarchical, the raucous array of imagery, line, and color in these paintings appears unbound by distinctions between high and low, foreground and background, or any sense of visual primacy. This allover quality subtly gestures towards Abstract Expressionism, even as Williams dismantles the movement’s infatuation with masculine seriousness and artistic genius through invocations of populist forms like illustration and cartoon. Her commitment to raw, gestural immediacy perhaps belies the complex network of marks she orchestrates in her compositions, producing an impression of movement and understated depth. “The machismo-laden history of modern painting that has been handed down to us has largely failed to account for feminists with formal concerns, but Williams has continuously short-circuited our reliance on such categories to understand what we’re looking at. …Formalism doesn’t erase feminism. She deals with the male-dominated history of American modernist painting not by positioning herself in opposition to it, but by giving it the finger, not playing on its terms. …She is showing us that these restrictive categories do not hold. The work is a messy space where things don’t have to get cleaned up; all of it can hang in suspension. She is showing us the rebelliousness of being a feminist and a formalist.” — Ashton Cooper, “Sue Williams” in ArtReview, 2017 Sue Williams (b. 1954, Chicago Heights, IL) received her BFA from the California Institute of the Arts. She lives and works in Brooklyn. Williams’s work has been the subject of numerous museum exhibitions worldwide including Institut Valencià d'Art Modern; Vienna Secession; Staatliche Kunsthalle Baden-Baden; Kunstlerhaus, Graz; and Centre d'Art Contemporain, Geneva; among others. Her work is included in major museum collections such as Art Institute of Chicago; Centre d’Art Contemporain Geneva; Dallas Museum of Art; The Broad, Los Angeles; Hirschhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington DC; Institut Valencià d'Art Modern; Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles; Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego; Museum of Modern Art, New York; National Museum of Modern and Contemporary, Seoul; New Museum, New York; San Francisco Museum of Modern Art; Santa Barbara Museum of Art; Seattle Art Museum; Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; among others. Image: My Neighbors, 2022. Oil on canvas, 50 1/4 x 60 inches

Abraham Cruzvillegas

Tres sonetos



March 5, 2022 - April 23, 2022
Regen Projects is pleased to present an exhibition of new works by Abraham Cruzvillegas. For his third solo presentation at Regen Projects, Cruzvillegas takes inspiration from the work of Mexican poet Concha Urquiza to create an all-new series of drawings, paintings, and sculptures all produced on-site during the installation of the exhibition. Over the past decade Cruzvillegas has continually explored the ways in which his life and experiences can find representation in physical form. His humorous but incisive takes on identity often employ animal avatars to draw out similarities between humans and other species, particularly primates. In a new series of drawings, the artist’s own photographic likeness serves as the basis for such investigations. Thin textiles printed with images of his face act as canvases that Cruzvillegas will embellish with designs rendered in bold colors. Employing a similar formal language, the artist will also present a group of large-scale calligraphic paintings. Composed flat on the gallery floor, he will use a mop or broom to apply paint in loose, expressive gestures that serve as records of their performative nature and translate from the rhythms and tones of the poems of Concha Urquiza into abstract form. Cruzvillegas’s practice is guided by an aesthetic and conceptual ethos he terms autoconstrucción. Literally meaning “self-construction,” it is inspired by ad hoc and collaborative popular building methods common to urban Mexico, in particular the Ajusco neighborhood of Mexico City where he was raised. Continuing his interest in functional form, the artist has designed three new structures that will serve at once as sculpture, platform, and gallery seating. Taking rudimentary geometric shapes and primary colors as their basis, these new works expand on sculptures first showcased in the artist’s recent presentation Agua dulce at the Bass Museum, Miami Beach. For this exhibition, they will become elements of a performance taking place at the gallery on the occasion of the opening reception, where they will serve as platforms for a rhythmic reading by Cruzvillegas of three of Urquiza’s poems. Abraham Cruzvillegas (b. 1968, Mexico City, Mexico) earned a BA in pedagogy from Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México in Mexico City in 1990. From 1987–1991 he participated in Gabriel Orozco’s workshop, known as Taller de los Viernes, or The Friday Workshop, alongside Damián Ortega, Gabriel Kuri, and Jerónimo “Dr. Lacra” López. From 2018–2021, he taught sculpture at l'École Nationale Supérieure des Beaux-Arts in Paris. He lives and works in Mexico City. Cruzvillegas’s work has been shown in solo exhibitions worldwide including, most recently, Agua dulce, Bass Museum of Art, Miami Beach (2020–2022); Song, La Maison de Rendez-Vous, Brussels (2020); Tautología sin Título, Galería Macchina, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Santiago (2019); The Ballad of Etc., The Arts Club of Chicago (2019); Hi, how are you, Gonzo?, The Contemporary Austin and Aspen Art Museum (2019); Autorreconstrucción: Social Tissue, Kunsthaus Zürich (2018); The Water Trilogy 3: Autoconclusion: Ideologically Inconsistent Identity: Jetties, Gutters & Urinals, Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen, Rotterdam (2017); The Water Trilogy 2: Autodefensión Microtonal Obrera Campesina Estudiantil Metabolista Descalza, Fondation d’entreprise Hermès, Tokyo (2017); Abraham Cruzvillegas: Approximating Vibrant Retroflex Self-Constriction, Carré d'Art — Musée d’art contemporain, Nîmes (2016); Autocontusión, Scrap Metal, Toronto (2016); Empty Lot, Tate Modern, London (2015); MALI in situ, Museo de arte de Lima (2015); Autoconstrucción, Museo Jumex, Mexico City and Museo Amparo, Puebla (2014); The Autoconstrucción Suites, Haus der Kunst, Munich (2014) and Walker Art Center, Minneapolis (2013); among others. He has participated in the 2nd Biennale d’Architecture d’Orléans, France (2019); Honolulu Biennial (2019); 21st Biennale of Sydney (2018); X Bienal de Nicaragua, Managua (2016); 12th Sharjah Biennial, United Arab Emirates (2015); 10th and 12th Havana Biennial (2009, 2015); Shanghai Biennial (2012); Documenta13, Kassel (2012); 12th Istanbul Biennial (2012); and the 50th Venice Biennale (2003). Cruzvillegas was the recipient of the 5th Yanghyun Foundation Yanghyun Prize (2012) and the Fundación Altadis Prix Altadis d’arts plastiques (2006). He was the artist in residence at the Deutscher Akademischer Austauschdienst (DAAD) (2010–2011); Capp Street Project at CCA Wattis Institute for Contemporary Arts (2009); Smithsonian Institution’s Artist Research Fellowship (2008); a joint resident at the Center for Contemporary Arts and Cove Park (2008); Civitella Ranieri Foundation (2007); Brownstone Foundation (2006–07); and Atelier Calder (2005). Photo: Haru Heshiki

Rachel Harrison

Caution Kneeling Bus



January 15, 2022 - February 20, 2022
Regen Projects is pleased to announce an exhibition of new works by Rachel Harrison. Over the last thirty years, Harrison has pioneered an approach to art-making that melds formal invention with the artifacts of popular culture. Wryly assimilating readymade objects into otherwise handmade, abstract forms, her citational impulse draws freely on both the history of art and the dregs of our political landscape. This solo show follows her major mid-career survey Rachel Harrison Life Hack at the Whitney Museum of American Art in 2019–20. . . . As Maggie Nelson has written, “many elements of Harrison’s practice are incommunicable, save in concert”—and even then, nothing’s assured. The artist’s impulse both to catalog and to estrange the world around her has always run on a number of tracks, which continue to branch and multiply in her latest exhibition. Caution Kneeling Bus marks the US premiere of a new series of paintings made with the smartphone app Scanner Pro. Here software designed for digitizing text—scanning a document, uploading receipts—is put to alternative use, as the artist turns it on three-dimensional spaces that elude the program's settings. Confusion results, and the app spits out the visual data it can’t process in splashes of unnatural color. Glitches imposed by the algorithm lend an alien cast to everyday scenes—only partially offset by the humanizing presence of paint, which Harrison applies sparingly to each work’s surface. The series’ prevailing sense of disorientation is heightened by hanging all the images vertically, at times defying gravity: a once-reclining nude seems to levitate, a doorway becomes unenterable, a car is poised to fall off the road. Issues of balance (and makeshift ways to strike it) persist among some of the sculptural assemblages also on view. In Venus (2021), a headless replica is encased in a vitrine and perched on a slab-like armature, which is shimmed with the artist’s New Balance sneakers, bringing the whole construction into fragile alignment. Another space contains the room-scaled work Hot Topic #2 (2022), a mental map of the mistrust and paranoid thinking that have made our bedrock institutions feel increasingly unstable. Taken together, the works are visually dissonant and occupy conflicting thematic registers (a stray coffee cup here, the storming of the Capitol there, and signs of manufactured caution throughout). Yet, as Nelson has argued, Harrison's resistance to summation is vital to “the genius and originality of her tone…some improbable combination of jaunty, caustic, rangy, and rapt, running asymptotic to the more usual sounds of satire, insubordination, insouciance, and absurdity. Often I feel as though she’s driving a car—a pretty fast car—right alongside these categories, but somehow she remains in an outer lane, a fugitive from their certainty or recognizability.” Rachel Harrison (b. 1966, New York, NY) lives and works in New York. Recent solo and two-person museum exhibitions include Rachel Harrison Life Hack, Whitney Museum of American Art (2019–20); Perth Amboy, The Museum of Modern Art, New York (2016); Voyage of the Beagle, Two, The Bass Museum of Art, Miami Beach (2015); Gloria: Robert Rauschenberg & Rachel Harrison, The Cleveland Museum of Art (2015); Fake Titel, Kestner Gesellschaft, Hannover (2013), which traveled to S.M.A.K., Ghent (2013); and Consider the Lobster, Hessel Museum of Art, Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson (2009), which traveled as HAYCATION to Portikus, Frankfurt am Main (2009–10) and Conquest of the Useless, Whitechapel Gallery, London (2010); among others. Her work is included in major public collections worldwide including the Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo; Art Institute of Chicago; Astrup Fearnley Museet, Oslo; Centre Georges Pompidou, Paris; Getty Center, Los Angeles; Hammer Museum, Los Angeles; Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington, DC; Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston; Los Angeles County Museum of Art; The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; Moderna Museet, Stockholm; The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles; Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago; Museum of Fine Arts, Houston; The Museum of Modern Art, New York; Philadelphia Museum of Art; San Francisco Museum of Modern Art; Seattle Museum of Art; Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York; Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam; Tate Modern, London; Walker Art Center, Minneapolis; and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; among others.

Wolfgang Tillmans

Concrete Column



November 6, 2021 - December 23, 2021
Regen Projects is pleased to present an exhibition of works by German artist Wolfgang Tillmans. This presentation marks the artist’s eighth solo show at Regen Projects and precedes a major survey at the Museum of Modern Art in New York, opening in September of 2022. This exhibition will present selections from many of the artist’s most recognized bodies of work, as well as new photographs and a listening room where Tillmans’s debut full-length musical album will play accompanied by a new video work. The photographs on display range in genre from portraiture and still life to architectural, landscape, astrophotography, abstract, and cameraless photography. The wide-ranging subject matter collectively showcases Tillmans’s unique perspective and his ability to use the many languages of photography to enunciate his trajectory through the world. Tillmans distills our fragmented, image-saturated moment into a subjective experience—capturing the political, personal, and aesthetic at once. Tillmans’s interest in the changing states of matter is of particular note in this exhibition and manifests in photos of materials and subjects in various states of suspension—concrete being poured, eclipses and planetary crossings, turbulent seascapes, rolled paper, and photochemical reactions. The exhibition will serve as a visual essay of the artist’s myriad interests and boundless curiosity. The tender, exquisite, everyday, transient, and fortuitous are put into dialogue, continuing Tillmans’s engagement with the material and conceptual possibilities of the photographic medium. Tillmans’s photographs have long engaged with music, its cultural significance, and the shared experience of listening to it—from images of raves, club scenes, and dance parties to videos of the artist himself dancing. Key to this moment and exhibition is the performative nature of music and its ability to bring people back together in an era of social distancing. The exhibition at Regen Projects will present a listening room where viewers can experience Tillmans’s first full-length album, Moon in Earthlight. The music and sound recordings were made over the course of the last three years. Similar to his photographic practice, these recordings bring together divergent production and recording methods including field recordings, sketches, jams, and proper studio productions into one consecutive audio project. "Tillmans has from the start not only pushed the limits of the kinds of subjects that can be accommodated by photography…but has also asked what kind of objects photographs themselves can be….Tillmans positions photographs in time and space so as to emphasize their very situatedness, relative to one another and to the viewer. Utilizing a spectrum—rather than a binary—to describe photography’s accommodation of abstraction and representation, he similarly disables lingering notions that photographs are simply the ‘mirrors and windows’ through which we access the world.” —Johanna Burton, “Pictures in the Present Tense” Wolfgang Tillmans (b. 1968, Remscheid, Germany) studied at Bournemouth and Poole College of Art and Design, United Kingdom, graduating in 1992. He lives and works in Berlin and London. A major exhibition of his work will be presented at the Museum of Modern Art in New York in the fall of 2022. Currently his work is being presented in Accra, Ghana in Fragile, a touring African survey organized by the Institut für Auslandsbeziehungen (2018–2021). Selected solo exhibitions include Museum Moderner Kunst Stiftung Ludwig Wien (MUMOK), Vienna (2021); WIELS Contemporary Art Centre, Brussels (2020); Carré d'Art — Nîmes Museum of Contemporary Art, France (2018); Irish Museum of Modern Art, Dublin (2018); Tate Modern, London (2017); Beyeler Foundation, Basel (2017); Serralves Museum of Contemporary Art, Porto, Portugal (2016); National Museum of Art, Osaka (2015); Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York (2015); Beyeler Foundation, Basel (2014); Kunstsammlung Nordrhein-Westfalen, Dusseldorf (2013); Les Rencontres d’Arles, France (2013); Museo de Arte de Lima (2013); Kunsthalle Zürich (2012); Museu de Arte Moderna de São Paulo (2012); Moderna Museet, Stockholm (2012); Zachęta National Gallery of Art, Warsaw (2011); Serpentine Gallery, London (2010); and the Walker Art Gallery, Liverpool (2010). His work has been included in significant biennial exhibitions including Manifesta 10, The State Hermitage Museum, St. Petersburg (2014); Fundamentals, 14th International Architecture Biennale, La Biennale di Venezia, Venice (2014); Berlin Biennale (2014, 1998); British Art Show 5 and 7, UK (2000, 2010); 3rd Moscow Biennale of Contemporary Art (2009); 51st and 53rd Venice Biennale (2005, 2009); Turin Triennial (2008); 55th Carnegie International, Carnegie Museum of Art, Pittsburgh (2008) and the 2nd Ars Baltica Triennial of Photographic Art, Kiel, Germany (1999). Recent monographs and publications by the artist include Wolfgang Tillmans: Saturated Light (Silver Works) (Galerie Buchholz and Walther König, 2021); Wolfgang Tillmans. four books. 40th Ed. (Taschen, 2020); Today Is The First Day (Irish Museum of Modern Art, WIELS, and Koenig Books, 2020); Wolfgang Tillmans: Fragile (Institut für Auslandsbeziehungen, 2018); Wolfgang Tillmans: On the Verge of Visibility (Serralves Foundation, 2016); Conor Donlon (Walther König, 2015); What’s Wrong with Redistribution (Walther König, 2015); Your Body is Yours (National Museum of Art, Osaka, 2015); The Cars (Walther König, 2015); Wolfgang Tillmans (Phaidon Press, 2014); Neue Welt (Taschen, 2012); FESPA Digital/Fruit Logistica (Walther König, 2012); and Wolfgang Tillmans: Abstract Pictures (Hatje Kantz, 2011). Tillmans has been the recipient of numerous awards, including the Hasselblad Foundation International Award in Photography (2015); Royal Academician Award (2014); Turner Prize (2001); Ars Viva Prize (1995); and Wirtschaft Prize (1995), among others. Work by the artist is included in prominent museum collections internationally, including Tate, London; National Portrait Gallery, London; Centre Georges Pompidou, Paris; Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam; Louisiana Museum of Art, Humlebæk, Denmark; Moderna Museet, Stockholm; Museum Ludwig, Cologne; National Museum of Art, Osaka; The Museum of Modern Art, New York; Guggenheim Museum, New York; Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington, DC; Art Institute of Chicago; Walker Art Center, Minneapolis; Hammer Museum, Los Angeles; Los Angeles County Museum of Art; and Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles.

Jack Pierson

Less and more



September 11, 2021 - October 23, 2021
Jack Pierson Less and more September 11 – October 23, 2021 Opening: Saturday, September 11, 10:00 am – 6:00 pm Gallery hours: Tuesday – Saturday, 10:00 am – 6:00 pm Regen Projects is pleased to present Less and more, a career-spanning exhibition of works by Jack Pierson. This marks the artist’s tenth solo presentation at the gallery. Over the course of more than three decades Pierson has wryly and poetically explored themes of memory, desire, longing, beauty, despair, loss, and glamour. Although Pierson emerged as the youngest member of the so-called Boston School, which included fellow photographers David Armstrong, Philip-Lorca diCorcia, Nan Goldin, and Mark Morrisroe, his practice quickly expanded beyond photography into drawing, painting, collage, installation, and text-based sculpture. Pierson is known for his ability to subtly coax the poetic from the everyday—manifesting romantic affect, longing, and desire through seemingly banal objects, rough sketches, and charged turns of phrase. As New York Times art critic Roberta Smith states in a recent exhibition review, “The deep content of Jack Pierson’s art is the vulnerability of life devoured by time.” Less and more will be arranged as a poetic, achronological, and comprehensive installation that tracks Pierson’s diverse yet idiosyncratic practice, creating a sojourn through his career. Pierson has undoubtedly mined his own queerness, and specifically queer desire, through both a historical and personal lens, tying these threads together through found images plucked from the media, snapshot photography, portraits, and collage. Early sculptures and installations recalling and even reconstructing slices of the domestic will also be brought together for the exhibition to showcase Pierson’s ability to imbue objects with the tenderness we often associate with the intimate space of the home. His practice has been equally invested in explorations of materiality, the formal qualities of line, shape, and color, and the possibilities inherent in abstraction. As such, this exhibition will showcase a wide selection of drawings, paintings, watercolors, and collages that provide evidence of Pierson’s long-standing commitment to these mediums and modes of expression. In addition to bringing together work produced during the length of Pierson’s career, Less and more will also present a selection of new works. The exhibition will include large-format photographs that transform earlier works into historical documents, text-based sculptures, and collaged works on metal supports that can be rearranged and reconfigured upon each showing to account for new material collected by the artist. Jack Pierson (b. 1960, Plymouth, MA) earned a BFA from the Massachusetts College of Art in 1984. Pierson’s work has been featured in solo exhibitions nationally and internationally including 5 Shows from the ‘90s, Aspen Art Museum (2017); OMG, Wadsworth Atheneum, Hartford, CT (2015); Centro de Arte Contemporáneo de Málaga (2009); Irish Museum of Modern Art, Dublin (2008); Regrets, Museum of Contemporary Art, Miami (2002); and the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago (1995); among others. Next spring, he will participate in High Desert Test Sites 2022: The Guests of Hotel Palenque. Work by the artist is held in prominent museum collections including The Baltimore Museum of Art; Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston; Los Angeles County Museum of Art; The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago; Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles; Museum of Contemporary Art, North Miami; Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston; San Francisco Museum of Modern Art; Seattle Art Museum; Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York; Walker Art Center, Minneapolis; Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; and Yale University Art Gallery, New Haven, among others. Pierson has been a prolific creator of artist books and zines throughout his career, with notable examples of these publications including the celebrated Tomorrow’s Man series, now in its fifth edition (Bywater Bros. Editions, 2020); JACK PIERSON + BABY ROBERTS (EY! BOY COLLECTION, 2020); Stardust (Salon Verlag, 2012); Sing a Song of Sixpence (Salon Verlag, 1997); All of a Sudden (Powerhouse, 1995); and Angel Youth (Galerie Aurel Scheibler, 1992). Several of his early artist books were compiled and reprinted in a 2008 monograph, Angel Youth (Charta, 2008), titled after his 1992 artist book. Other monographs of his work include The Hungry Years (Damiani, 2017); Desire/Despair (Rizzoli, 2006); Every Single One of Them (Twin Palms, 2004); The Lonely Life (Ursula Blickle, 1997); and All of a Sudden (Powerhouse, 1995); among others. He lives and works in New York and Wonder Valley, CA. For all press inquiries, please contact Elizabeth Gartner at +1 310 276 5424 or elizabeth@regenprojects.com. For all other inquiries, please contact Bryan Barcena, Stephanie Dudzinski, Jennifer Loh, or Irina Stark at Regen Projects.

Walead Beshty, Abraham Cruzvillegas, Theaster Gates, Dan Graham, Rachel Harrison, Elliott Hudley, Anish Kapoor, Liz Larner, Manfred Pernice, Lawrence Weiner

INHERENT FORM



July 28, 2021 - August 1, 2021
On the occasion of Gallery Weekend Los Angeles Walead Beshty, Abraham Cruzvillegas, Theaster Gates, Dan Graham, Rachel Harrison, Elliott Hudley, Anish Kapoor, Liz Larner, Manfred Pernice, Lawrence Weiner

Doug Aitken, Kader Attia, Matthew Barney, Walead Beshty, John Bock, Abraham Cruzvillegas, Theaster Gates, Dan Graham, Rachel Harrison, Alex Hubbard, Elliott Hundley, Sergej Jensen, Anish Kapoor, Liz Larner, Glenn Ligon, Marilyn Minter, Catherine Opie, Silke Otto-Knapp, Manfred Pernice, Raymond Pettibon, Jack Pierson, Lari Pittman, Daniel Richter, Wolfgang Tillmans, Ryan Trecartin, Gillian Wearing, Lawrence Weiner, James Welling, Sue Williams, and Andrea Zittel

Selections: Gallery Artists



June 5, 2021 - July 15, 2021
Regen Projects is pleased to present Selections: Gallery Artists, a group exhibition featuring artworks that showcase the varied scope of artistic practices from artists in our program. Artists in the exhibition include Doug Aitken, Kader Attia, Matthew Barney, Walead Beshty, John Bock, Abraham Cruzvillegas, Theaster Gates, Dan Graham, Rachel Harrison, Alex Hubbard, Elliott Hundley, Sergej Jensen, Anish Kapoor, Liz Larner, Glenn Ligon, Marilyn Minter, Catherine Opie, Silke Otto-Knapp, Manfred Pernice, Raymond Pettibon, Jack Pierson, Lari Pittman, Daniel Richter, Wolfgang Tillmans, Ryan Trecartin, Gillian Wearing, Lawrence Weiner, James Welling, Sue Williams, and Andrea Zittel. For all press inquiries, please contact Ben Thornborough at +1 310 276 5424 or benthornborough@regenprojects.com. For all other inquiries, please contact Bryan Barcena, Stephanie Dudzinski, Sarvia Jasso, or Irina Stark at Regen Projects.

Liz Larner

As Stars and Seas Entwine



March 27, 2021 - May 22, 2021
Regen Projects is pleased to present As Stars and Seas Entwine, the eighth solo exhibition by Los Angeles-based artist Liz Larner, whose deep research-based practice is united by a continual exploration of form, material, and color. This exhibition will debut one of the new large-scale floor sculptures and a number of ceramic works that will be included in Below Above, a forthcoming museum exhibition at Kunsthalle Zurich in the summer of 2022. The works on view reveal Larner’s acceptance of Posthumanist thought that the Anthropocene induces as the world becomes beleaguered by rapidly depleting resources and the massive waste that accompanies our extractive industries. The large low floor sculpture, a sea foam/meerschaum drift, seems to billow and surge through the space. The undulating form constructed of conjoined plastic refuse was collected by Larner over the course of three years. Serving as a meditation on the pervasive and exponential presence of plastic in the world, the sculpture is at once beautiful and horrible, a complex combination that evokes the pathos of its material. This Meerschaum Drift’s materiality belies its intricate form and supposes a transformation of crude material into an art object. Plastic-derived acrylic paint applied to its surface gives the sculpture the overall sense of movement in color from deep blue to green to white, evoking the ephemeral quality of sea foam for which it is named. As hinted to in the exhibition’s title, a new series of Asteroid works conjunct the same space as the Meerschaum Drift. These free-form ceramics embody the terrestrial material of their making while illuminating celestial qualities of asteroids, apparent in their form and unearthly looking glazed surfaces. The works stand for the many known and unknown bodies moving in space which contain the real possibility of violent collision, even as their presence and number in our solar system are always being discovered. Investigating the diffractive relation between human experience, cultural forms, material ecologies, and the natural world, Larner’s Asteroids embody a small piece of the heavens as art and ask us to consider our connection to that which is known but is not always seen.

curated by Elliott Hundley

Make-Shift-Future



March 27, 2021 - May 22, 2021
Regen Projects presents Make-Shift-Future, a group exhibition curated by Elliott Hundley, featuring Kevin Beasley, Elaine Cameron-Weir, rafa esparza, Max Hooper Schneider, Eric N. Mack, Alicia Piller, Eric-Paul Riege, and Kandis Williams. "I am interested in studying ancient literature because, like speculative fiction, it can massage loose the underpinnings of our attachments to pervasive contemporary mythologies, so that we might gain a clearer view of ourselves and reveal the blind spots. So many blind spots. Collage and assemblage function similarly by transposing tactile and familiar signs and symbols into new disquieting and uncanny situations. The medium, for much of its history, has scavenged for the discarded, broken, and disused. In this age of abundant material commerce, the predicted age of peak oil, we no longer need to wait to root through the trash. Objects are produced at such a staggering rate, that the time they spend in our lives is forever fleeting on the way to the landfill (tomorrow’s mine). These artists gather objects, valued and valueless, new and used, from their own material worlds. With the stuff of an ever-speeding present at hand, this current moment increasingly feels like the past. This exhibition brings together the work of eight emergent American artists who exploit this excess materiality of global commerce to mine history, to attune us to the meaning and artifacts of other people’s lives, and, I believe, to point to potential futures. Though informed and formed by history, they reject any nostalgia. Like Edith and Sodom or Orpheus and Eurydice, there is no looking back! As assemblage art is assimilated into the canon (see contemporary mythology) it hybridizes and folds back on the more traditional plastic arts. The work in this exhibition includes the full spectrum of the found and the fabricated, and in most cases those distinctions are softened again through artistry. The labor of the artist seems always relevant, intermingled with the labor that produced these original objects in the first place. Did they make this stitch or that one? The intensity of the artist’s hand and this doubling of the making of these objects lend them their charge. As with an artwork in the studio, unexpected meanings and connections reveal themselves in exhibitions. Seeing these works together, what emerged was a particular concern for the body and protecting it in different stages of life. The incubator, the skin, clothing, shoes, blankets, armor: What will we put on to keep us safe? What will we carry to keep us safe? What will help us in the future? What will liberate us?" — Elliott Hundley

Doug Aitken

Flags and Debris



January 16, 2021 - March 13, 2021
Regen Projects is pleased to present Flags and Debris, an exhibition of new work by Los Angeles-based artist Doug Aitken. The works form an ecosystem of interconnected mediums, mixing dance, performance, film, sculpture, and handmade objects. Each plays off the other, creating a choreography of images, language, and sound. The exhibition comprises all new work conceived in the last 10 months, a time of profound change in the face of the pandemic. The body of work reflects the tension collectively felt between our isolation from the physical landscape of the exterior world and newly created spaces for turning inward to explore the subconscious landscape. At heart, the works are a portrait of a society moving toward the future. Flags and Debris consists of a new series of handmade fabric wall hangings and a hallucinatory multi-screen installation. The fabric works were generated during lockdown when, searching for materials inside his home, Aitken began to cut clothes and fabrics. From these materials he created shapes to articulate words and phrases that spoke of a shifting world in continuous change. Conversely, the physical process of creating these works was a study of stillness. They resemble flags and banners while also suggesting protective coverings for warmth and security. The collaged layers of fabric build into visual and written abstractions. These works provoke reflection on the nature of reality and visions of the future: Fragmented phrases like ‘Noise,’ ‘Digital Detox,’ ‘Data Mining,’ ‘Nowhere/Somewhere,’ and ‘Resist Algorithms’ appear like handcrafted digital glitches, while other works ruminate in full prose, including an excerpt from a text by Joan Didion, whose writing has served as an inspiration to Aitken. Aitken also initiated a series of impromptu performances throughout Los Angeles using the new fabric works. He filmed these performances, translating them into the new multi-screen installation. The performances are based on choreographies Aitken developed working with LA Dance Project. Wrapped in the artworks, the dancers moved through desolate industrial locations and empty urban spaces. Their movements were unique to each setting, activating the spaces with kinetic energy. The film captures fleeting moments and mysterious and random encounters. Sleepwalking bodies are wrapped and covered, moving, jerking, fighting, and thrusting through the nocturnal, desolate city. The fabric moves through the wind as though empty — phantom presences roaming through spaces. The film reflects snapshots of a surreal life, as if seen out of the corner of the eye, pushing one to explore a modern landscape that is in continuous flux. It is set in shadowland spaces such as freeway underpasses, urban rivers, and desolate industrial areas where empty sites are transformed from passive to active. Bodies occupying the artworks shapeshift under the layers of fabric in movements that explore the unseen and hidden worlds of interior thought. In discussing the work Aitken said, “Flags and Debris acts like a kaleidoscopic mirror, reflecting a broken narrative landscape. Pulses of electricity merge with the human heartbeat through a landscape that is expansive and anonymous. As we look at these artworks, we stand looking at a horizon transfixed at what could be, uncertain of where we are positioned, but looking towards the possibilities of the future.” The exhibition furthermore extends outside the gallery walls by way of a poster campaign wheat-pasted across Los Angeles. Containing a QR code, the posters act as virtual portals, expanding the art experience to anyone — anywhere — in the city. Ubiquitous and yet hidden in plain sight, the posters are an egalitarian art encounter, further blurring the boundary between our physical and digital realities. Those with the curiosity to engage with it are transported in place to an experience of Los Angeles as they have never seen it before. Aitken would like to thank LA Dance Project and Sébastien Marcovici for their participation in this project, and in particular, the talented dancers Anthony Lee Bryant, David Adrian Freeland, Jr., Mario Gonzalez, Vinicius Silva, and Nayomi Van Brunt. Image: Target, 2020. Hand dyed cotton, 116 x 118 1/2 inches (294.6 x 301 cm).

Kader Attia

The Valley of Dreams



November 12, 2020 - December 23, 2020

James Welling

Archaeology



September 26, 2020 - October 31, 2020

Raymond Pettibon

Pacific Ocean Pop



September 12, 2020 - October 31, 2020

Andrea Zittel

Works 2005 – 2020



July 13, 2020 - August 21, 2020

Catherine Opie

Rhetorical Landscapes



February 27, 2020 - April 4, 2020

Lawrence Weiner

ON VIEW



February 27, 2020 - April 4, 2020

Anish Kapoor



January 11, 2020 - February 16, 2020

Alex Hubbard

The Corner of the Table



November 16, 2019 - December 21, 2019

Theaster Gates

Line Drawing for Shirt and Cloak



September 14, 2019 - November 2, 2019

Daniel Richter

H.P. (jah allo)



June 29, 2019 - August 17, 2019

Elliott Hundley



May 17, 2019 - June 22, 2019

Liz Larner



May 17, 2019 - June 22, 2019

Christina Quarles

But I Woke Jus’ Tha Same



April 6, 2019 - May 9, 2019

Glenn Ligon

Untitled (America)/Debris Field/Synecdoche/Notes for a Poem on the Third World



January 12, 2019 - February 17, 2019

Tavares Strachan

Invisibles



November 2, 2018 - December 22, 2018

Lari Pittman

Portraits of Textiles & Portraits of Humans



September 15, 2018 - October 27, 2018

Dan Graham

New Works By A Small-Town Boy



July 7, 2018 - August 18, 2018

Marilyn Minter



May 19, 2018 - June 23, 2018

Sue Williams



April 14, 2018 - May 12, 2018

Walead Beshty

Equivalents



March 2, 2018 - April 7, 2018