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456 West 18th Street
New York, NY 10011
212 680 9467

Also at:
35 East 67th Street, Parlor & 3rd Floors
New York, NY 10065
212 680 9467
Friedrich Petzel Gallery, founded in 1994, first opened on Wooster Street in the Soho area of New York City. In 2000, the gallery moved to 537 West 22nd Street in Chelsea and in 2006 expanded to include a separate space next door dedicated to smaller exhibitions, artists' projects, and performances. In Fall 2008, Friedrich Petzel Gallery opened a joint gallery with Galerie Gisela Capitain, Cologne. This new gallery, called Capitain Petzel, is housed in a glass-encased gallery located in Mitte section of Berlin and presents exhibitions of established international artists. After eleven years on 22nd Street, Petzel Gallery closed this space, expanding into a new location at 456 18th Street in 2012.  In March of 2015, Petzel opened a second space in New York, a new, uptown location at 35 East 67th Street. Situated in a townhouse, the new gallery will curate historic exhibitions by artists within the Petzel program as well as focus on curatorial projects and publishing activities. Both galleries in New York are complimented by Capitain Petzel in Berlin. The move to the new, larger 18th Street location and expansion uptown continue Petzel Gallery’s commitment to develop its program upon the scope, diversity, and ambitions of the artists that it represents.

Friedrich Petzel Gallery has continued to develop its program around a group of contemporary artists who are renowned internationally: Yael Bartana, Walead Beshty, Cosima von Bonin, Troy Brauntuch, Simon Denny, Keith Edmier, Thomas Eggerer, Wade Guyton, Georg Herold, Charline von Heyl, Dana Hoey, Christian Jankowski, Sean Landers, Rezi van Lankveld, Maria Lassnig, Allan McCollum, Adam McEwen, Sarah Morris, Jorge Pardo, Joyce Pensato, Seth Price, Stephen Prina, Jon Pylypchuk, Willem de Rooij, Dana Schutz, Dirk Skreber, John Stezaker, Nicola Tyson, Corinne Wasmuht, and Heimo Zobernig. Each artist has exhibited widely in both museums and galleries throughout the world and are regularly included in international exhibitions such as Documenta, the Whitney Biennial, The Carnegie International, and the São Paulo Biennial. Numerous publications are available on all the gallery artists.

Friedrich Petzel Gallery also deals in outstanding artworks from the last thirty years by artists such as: Robert Gober, Mike Kelley, Martin Kippenberger, Jeff Koons, Louise Lawler, John Miller, Albert Oehlen, Sigmar Polke, Richard Prince, Cindy Sherman, Thomas Struth, and Christopher Wool.
Artists Represented:
Yael Bartana
Walead Beshty
Ross Bleckner
Cosima von Bonin
Troy Brauntuch
Simon Denny
Keith Edmier
Thomas Eggerer
Derek Fordjour
Wade Guyton
Robert Heinecken
Stefanie Heinze
Georg Herold
Charline von Heyl
Dana Hoey
Christian Jankowski
Asger Jorn
Sean Landers
Rezi van Lankveld
Maria Lassnig
Allan McCollum
Adam McEwen
Rodney McMillian
Sarah Morris
Jorge Pardo
Joyce Pensato
Seth Price
Stephen Prina
Jon Pylypchuk
Willem de Rooij
Pieter Schoolwerth
Dana Schutz
Dirk Skreber
John Stezaker
Hiroki Tsukuda
Nicola Tyson
Corinne Wasmuht
Heimo Zobernig

 

 
456 West 18th Street, exterior view
35 East 67th Street, interior view
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Online Programming

Maria Lassnig

Ode to New York: Drawings 1968–1980

456 West 18th Street
New York, NY 10011

Petzel is pleased to present an online exhibition of works on paper by Austrian artist Maria Lassnig. Developed in close collaboration with the Maria Lassnig Foundation, the exhibition comprises six watercolors and nine pencil drawings depicting Maria Lassnig’s time in New York City from 1968–1980, alongside film footage shot by Lassnig documenting her fascination with the performers, musicians, and pedestrian dancers that she encountered on the pulsating streets of Manhattan. In scenes captured by Lassnig from the parks, rooftops, and windows of 1970s New York, we observe an artist as she revels in the liberation of a new, American landscape. From cityscapes to skylines, abstracted self-portraits, and moments in the famed Chelsea Hotel, Lassnig chronicles both herself and her surroundings in a sweeping ode to New York. In 1968, at the age of 49, Lassnig moved from her home in Paris to New York City, to be in, as she called it, “the country of strong women." Although well-known in her native Austria, Lassnig was virtually unheard of in the United States and lived, for the next 12 years, in relative anonymity, renting walk-up apartments on the Lower East Side and Soho. According to those who knew her, she felt an affinity with the City; loved its constant activity, dynamism and the sense of freedom it engendered. New York City offered Lassnig a liberation of sorts from the male-dominated art scene of Europe. It gave her the opportunity to be an artist, not simply a female artist — and she worked prolifically, producing paintings, drawings, watercolors, silkscreen prints and animated films, often including hints of Americana in her work. Lassnig’s New York years were an incredibly formative time for the artist, a period in which she further developed her singular “body sensation” or “body awareness” aesthetic of the late 1940s – using sensations of the body as conduits to envision the external world. Her self-reflective pencil drawings from this period exemplify how Lassnig also turned toward realism identified with portraiture. These drawings reflect how the artistic freedom Lassnig enjoyed in the City allowed her to experiment in other art forms, including film. She even went on to study animated film at the School of Visual Arts for one semester in the spring of 1971, and in 1974 she co-founded the Women/Artist/Filmmakers, Inc., a group of feminist filmmakers. Petzel’s much-anticipated exhibition Maria Lassnig: The Paris Years, 1960-68, which was originally scheduled to open this spring, will now open in April 2021 and will be accompanied by a catalog with an essay by Lauren O'Neill-Butler.

Yael Bartana, Thomas Eggerer, Sean Landers, Adam McEwen, Rodney McMillian, Sarah Morris, Seth Price, Stephen Prina, Dirk Skreber, John Stezaker, Nicola Tyson, and Corinne Wasmuht.

21st Century Landscapes

456 West 18th Street
New York, NY 10011

While landscape painting dates back to antiquity, it only became a serious genre when artists began using landscapes as a retreat from the complexities of modern life. The 19th century brought landscapes to the forefront through plein air techniques. The landscape became a reflection of the philosophy when previously, landscapes were simply an image of pastoral idyll. The effects of the anthropocene on art have intensified with time. Today we are faced with new challenges: climate change, environmental destruction, and population density. The 21st century has an even more strained relationship with nature and an even greater dependence on technology. Our ecological crisis marked the collapse of traditional landscape, and modern gives way to contemporary. We have a radical new conceptualization of landscape, no longer tethered to factual depiction. Our perception is distorted by digital aesthetics which results in new, imagined landscapes. Scenes that could only be afforded by contemporary technology are present in the works by Yael Bartana, Thomas Eggerer, Sean Landers, Adam McEwen, Rodney McMillian, Sarah Morris, Seth Price, Stephen Prina, Dirk Skreber, John Stezaker, Nicola Tyson, and Corinne Wasmuht. Today, we can only dream of the bucolic landscapes of the past while we try to make sense of the present.

Nicola Tyson

Works on Paper

456 West 18th Street
New York, NY 10011

New graphite drawings on paper alongside time-lapse footage documenting the artist's process. "When I begin to draw, I have no idea what's going to appear. I work swiftly, to stay just ahead of the cage of language, the linear mind and rational decision-making. I just let the forms grow themselves—self-organize..." –Nicola Tyson

Allan McCollum

Early Works

456 West 18th Street
New York, NY 10011

On the occasion of Allan McCollum’s first US museum retrospective currently mounted at the ICA Miami, Petzel is pleased to present a special online exhibition of the artist’s rarely seen early paintings. Though the ICA Miami is temporarily closed due to COVID concerns, the show will be extended upon reopening and will subsequently travel to the Mildred Lane Kemper Art Museum in St. Louis. Over the past 50 years, McCollum has explored how objects achieve public and personal meaning in a world caught up in the contradictions between unique handmade artworks and objects of mass production. The works presented here focus on some of his earliest forays into art: the Bleach Paintings and Constructed Paintings. Dating from the early 1970s, they represent a key transitional moment anticipating the artist’s lifelong preoccupation with serial production and strategies of display.

 
Current Exhibition

Rodney McMillian

Recirculating Goods

35 East 67th Street, Parlor & 3rd Floors
New York, NY 10065

February 27, 2020 - July 31, 2020

 
Upcoming Exhibition

Danica Barboza, Genesis Belanger, Meriem Bennani, Sascha Braunig, Florencia Escudero, Hadi Fallahpisheh, Anna Glantz, Ivy Haldeman, Christina Quarles, Emily Mae Smith, and Greg Parma Smith

A Love Letter to a Nightmare

456 West 18th Street
New York, NY 10011

July 15, 2020 - August 14, 2020
The skeleton was as happy as a madman whose straitjacket had been taken off. He felt liberated at being able to walk without flesh. The mosquitoes didn’t bite him anymore. He didn’t have to have his hair cut. He was neither hungry nor thirsty, hot nor cold. He was far from the lizard of love. – Leonora Carrington, The Seventh Horse and Other Tales As we reopen, Petzel Gallery is pleased to present A Love Letter to a Nightmare, a summer group exhibition that will be on view from July 15 – August 14 at the gallery’s Chelsea location. The exhibition’s premise is to take into consideration contemporary visual modes and expressions that trace back to historical movements such as Surrealism, Symbolism and Pop, through the lens of our current uncertain existence. Call it vamped Surrealism and Symbolism. The show ponders how the aesthetic of modern surrealism/symbolism has been dressed up and added upon, sexualized, feminized, and reworked in the 21st Century. How does the state of a bound subconscious affect these artworks? This has become especially prevalent while the world shelters from the coronavirus pandemic and confronts centuries of inequity in a moment of historic unrest and great potential for revolutionary change. Beneath our daily struggle for normalcy bubbles a shared unconscious anxiety, fear, loneliness, despair, and trepidation of the future. In these times, the fabric of society is now both flattened into two dimensions as we socialize through screens – from our Zoom meetings, family check-ins, and “cocktails with friends,” to the daily State and Federal news conferences, Instagram stories, and Tik Tok videos – and yet simultaneously burst open in valiant action both intellectual and physical as we gather, protest, and organize in efforts to reimagine and rebuild a more just world. Our dreams have become more “vivid” and “menacing,” according to The New York Times, and, of course, in fantasy there is room for radical possibility. How might these practices of contemporary Surrealism, Symbolism and Pop, be read and implemented in reaction to the current upheaval? As one of the artists offered – how might these daydreams and nightmares be used as “forms of resistance, or in addressing trauma, enfranchising the masses, and envisioning necessary escape?” The exhibition asks how does each artist’s subjective work – painting, sculpture, installation, and video – explain a world riddled with multiple “objective” truths? A Love Letter to a Nightmare includes work by Danica Barboza, Genesis Belanger, Meriem Bennani, Sascha Braunig, Florencia Escudero, Hadi Fallahpisheh, Anna Glantz, Ivy Haldeman, Christina Quarles, Emily Mae Smith, and Greg Parma Smith. Petzel Gallery thanks all the participating artists and their galleries for their collaboration: C L E A R I N G, Downs & Ross, David Lewis, LOMEX, Kristen Lorello, Perrotin, Regen Projects, and Simone Subal Gallery. Image: Sascha Braunig, Deep V, 2019, Oil on linen over panel, 60 x 38 inches.

 
Past Exhibitions

Private View

35 East 67th Street, Parlor & 3rd Floors
New York, NY 10065

March 5, 2020 - May 31, 2020
Petzel presents “Private View,” a special exhibition of works by gallery artists. The show, on view at 35 East 67th Street, Third Floor, includes works by Ross Bleckner, Cosima von Bonin, Keith Edmier, Derek Fordjour, Wade Guyton, Charline von Heyl, Sean Landers, Maria Lassnig, Jorge Pardo, Seth Price, Jon Pylypchuk, Dana Schutz, Nicola Tyson, Corinne Wasmuht, and Heimo Zobernig.

Hiroki Tsukuda

They Live

456 West 18th Street
New York, NY 10011

March 5, 2020 - June 8, 2020
Petzel Gallery is pleased to present They Live, a solo exhibition of new works by Hiroki Tsukuda. The show will be on view from March 5 to April 18, 2020 and marks Tsukuda’s second exhibition at the gallery’s Chelsea location. An opening reception with the artist will be held on Thursday, March 5th, from 6–8pm. In reference to John Carpenter’s 1988 cult classic film with the same name, They Live presents a dystopian reality whereby current society has become surreptitiously controlled by humanoid extraterrestrials. Enamored by sci-fi since early childhood, Tsukuda has drawn inspiration from dystopic thrillers, apocalyptic novels, and cyberpunk manga. These fictions have percolated into the artist’s consciousness, transforming his ideas and artistic practice. Working in the realms of drawing and digital collage, Tsukuda creates multi-dimensional pictures by compositing a profusion of found and created images and coding them with computerized characters and cryptic hieroglyphics. The resulting images appear in states of controlled chaos and organic mutation, edging on a pictorial language that merges cyberpunk fantasy and real-life space exploration. Some of these abstractions hang off of large hollow wooden enclosures while a set of four bionic figures suspend from vacant steel-pipe scaffolds. Rocks, driftwood, and other organic materials are presented on wooden shelves alongside these cybernetic environments. This exhibition also features work that combines photographs and improvisational drawings, and engages with a new technique in which geometries and cartographic representations are rendered onto acrylic frames through silkscreen printing. Hiroki Tsukuda was born in Kagawa, Japan in 1978, and graduated from the Department of Imaging Arts & Sciences at Musashino Art University. In recent years he has received increasing international acclaim with numerous solo exhibitions including Monolog in the Doom, Museum of Modern Art, Gunma, 2019; 199X Storm Garden, Capitain Petzel, Berlin, 2019; 199X, Nanzuka, Tokyo, 2018; Hour of Excavation, Neuer Aachener Kunstverein, Aachen, Germany, 2017; Hiroki Tsukuda, Galerie Gisela Capitain, Cologne, Germany, 2017. A largescale work was recently acquired by The Museum of Modern Art, New York. His work is included in private and public collections worldwide.

Walead Beshty

Abstract of A Partial Disassembling of an Invention Without a Future: Helter-Skelter and Random Notes in Which the Pulleys and Cogwheels Are Lying Around at Random All Over the Workbench

456 West 18th Street
New York, NY 10011

October 24, 2019 - December 14, 2019

Wade Guyton and Stephen Prina

456 West 18th Street
New York, NY 10011

September 12, 2019 - October 5, 2019

Stephen Prina

English for Foreigners (abridged)

35 East 67th Street, Parlor & 3rd Floors
New York, NY 10065

September 11, 2019 - October 26, 2019

Dana Hoey

Dana Hoey Presents

456 West 18th Street
New York, NY 10011

June 27, 2019 - August 2, 2019

Andachtsbild: Curated by Karel Schampers

35 East 67th Street, Parlor & 3rd Floors
New York, NY 10065

May 3, 2019 - June 22, 2019

Ross Bleckner

Pharmaceutria

456 West 18th Street
New York, NY 10011

April 24, 2019 - June 15, 2019

Strategic Vandalism: The Legacy of Asger Jorn’s Modification Paintings

456 West 18th Street
New York, NY 10011

March 5, 2019 - April 13, 2019

Jorge Pardo

Eccentric Reflexivity 1988–1994

35 East 67th Street, Parlor & 3rd Floors
New York, NY 10065

February 28, 2019 - April 27, 2019

Adam McEwen

35 East 67th Street, Parlor & 3rd Floors
New York, NY 10065

January 22, 2019 - February 16, 2019

Dana Schutz

Imagine Me and You

456 West 18th Street
New York, NY 10011

January 10, 2019 - February 23, 2019

Seth Price

Hell Has Everything

456 West 18th Street
New York, NY 10011

November 8, 2018 - January 5, 2019

Sarah Morris

Midtown Paintings: 1998–2001

35 East 67th Street, Parlor & 3rd Floors
New York, NY 10065

November 1, 2018 - January 5, 2019

Wade Guyton and Stephen Prina

456 West 18th Street
New York, NY 10011

October 26, 2018 - October 27, 2018

Painting: Martin Kippenberger, Maria Lassnig, Albert Oehlen, Dana Schutz

35 East 67th Street, Parlor & 3rd Floors
New York, NY 10065

September 12, 2018 - November 3, 2018

Seth Price

456 West 18th Street
New York, NY 10011

September 8, 2018 - January 5, 2019

Charline von Heyl

New Work

456 West 18th Street
New York, NY 10011

September 6, 2018 - October 20, 2018

Haroshi, Makoto Taniguchi, Masato Mori

Condo New York: Nanzuka at Petzel

35 East 67th Street, Parlor & 3rd Floors
New York, NY 10065

June 29, 2018 - July 27, 2018

Christian Jankowski

2017

456 West 18th Street
New York, NY 10011

June 28, 2018 - August 3, 2018

Wade Guyton

Patagonia

456 West 18th Street
New York, NY 10011

May 4, 2018 - June 16, 2018

Dirk Skreber

days before

35 East 67th Street, Parlor & 3rd Floors
New York, NY 10065

May 2, 2018 - June 23, 2018

Sean Landers

35 East 67th Street, Parlor & 3rd Floors
New York, NY 10065

March 1, 2018 - April 21, 2018

Heimo Zobernig

nework

35 East 67th Street, Parlor & 3rd Floors
New York, NY 10065

January 18, 2018 - February 17, 2018