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437 North Paulina Street
Chicago, IL 60622
312 877 5436
After founding her namesake gallery in Seattle, Ibrahim and her program oficially launched their space in Chicago in 2019. In September 2021, the gallery opened it's inaugural European space in Paris. In January 2022, the gallery will celebrate it’s 10 year anniversary.

Mariane Ibrahim has hosted acclaimed exhibitions from leading and emerging artists including Amoako Boafo, Clotilde Jimenez, Maimouna Guerresi, Ayana V. Jackson, and most recently Jerrell Gibbs.

The gallery has had an international presence at art fairs with prize-winning presentations.
Artists Represented:
ruby onyinyechi amanze
Raphaël Barontini
Amoako Boafo
Florine Démosthène
Jerrell Gibbs
Maïmouna Guerresi
Mwangi Hutter
Yukimasa Ida
Ayana V. Jackson
Clotilde Jiménez
Shannon T. Lewis
Sergio Lucena
No Martins
Ian Mwesiga
Zohra Opoku
Peter Uka
Works Available By:
ruby onyinyechi amanze
Raphaël Barontini
Amoako Boafo
M. Florine Démosthène
Jerrell Gibbs
Maïmouna Guerresi
Mwangi Hutter
Yukimasa Ida
Ayana V. Jackson
Clotilde Jiménez
Shannon T. Lewis
Sergio Lucena
No Martins
Ian Michael
Ian Mwesiga
Carmen Neely
Zohra Opoku
Peter Uka

 
Current Exhibition

Ian Mwesiga

Theaters of Dreams



September 17, 2022 - October 29, 2022
Mwesiga’s works are abjectly peaceful scenes that appear simple in their composition but upon close observation subtly suggest questions whose responses only engender more questions. His subjects are always either dressed in blue or positioned against a blue background. Where a piano is included, the subject is either standing on it, leaning over it, or looking past it. The piano becomes a kind of anchor, it keeps time, it props up its subjects, but also allows them to experience rest. It is an instrument that provides multiple experiences none of which are about its primary use — music making. In color psychology, blue is understood as a calming color that brings peace and serenity. It is also a color, particularly in its association with water that hides the depths beneath. When associated with ice or the sky it can give rise to feelings of distance. Mwesiga’s blues imply and depict action. They are reflective of a young man’s dreams of playing basketball and the distinctive movements of his body while playing. Image Caption: Ian Mwesiga, Basketball Player IV, 2022. Courtesy of Mariane Ibrahim

 
Past Exhibitions

Zohra Opoku

I Have Arisen...



April 8, 2022 - May 14, 2022
The Myths of Eternal Life is Zohra Opoku’s latest body of work—an art practice that sought to be both healing and transformative. I Have Arisen will unveil Part One of this series, the second to debut in her first solo exhibition in Paris. Across Zohra Opoku’s practice, one might consider an underlying question: How do we hold it all together when things are fragmented or have fallen to pieces? Opoku answers this by making evident her sutures. Her new series continues to ponder this inquiry, as she brings together two years of works that she created in the wake of her cancer diagnosis to stitch together a story of devastation and rejuvenation.

ruby onyinyechi amanze, Raphaël Barontini, Amoako Boafo, M. Florine Démosthène, Jerrell Gibbs, Maïmouna Guerresi, Mwangi Hutter, Yukimasa Ida, Ayana V. Jackson, Clotilde Jiménez, Shannon T. Lewis, Sergio Lucena, No Martins, Ian Mwesiga, Ferrari Sheppard, Zohra Opoku and Peter Uka

La Vie en Rose



February 5, 2022 - March 19, 2022
In using flowers as a subject, the artists present each bespoke work as a congratulatory gesture while exploring historical meanings and personal relevance of the efflorescence. Of the many artistic, historical, and emotional meanings and symbols of flowers, La Vie en Rose contemplates the beauty of and the idea of coming back to life. “In our 10th year, I envisioned flowers to present a resistance and a reclamation of beauty and joy in this new departure. They symbolize the purity and passion, the flowers from the artists are an offering, an antidote, a hopeful reminder of the fragility of life. The result is breathtaking, a collection of flower arrangements reflecting the artist own signature,” states Mariane Ibrahim.

Peter Uka

Longing



November 13, 2021 - December 18, 2021
Mariane Ibrahim is pleased to announce Longing, the gallery's inaugural exhibition with Peter Uka. On view in Chicago from November 13 – December 18, 2021, the show marks the artist's first show with the gallery and in the United States. Novelist Zadie Smith commented that “historical nostalgia” was a sentiment not “available” to black people: “I can’t go back to the fifties because life in the fifties for me is not pretty, nor is it pretty in 1320 or 1460 or 1580 or 1820 or even 1960 in this country, very frankly.” The large-scale oil paintings exude notions of nostalgia, a gaze on spaces long forgotten. The works timeless ability arise from a query, how do we document a history that was unwritten, and only told orally? Of historical memories recounted and not crystallized. Moments in time are captured, each representing a chamber of reflection, all solely painted from memory. Uka finds strength in referencing familiar scenes and moments in Nigeria, through an era specific and recognizable collective memory. These instants were engraved in his early recollections – poses of brothers arm in arm, the bright, surrounding colors and patterns – presenting his personal link to his life left behind when moving to Germany. His works form a tangible way to display mutuality in the experience worldwide, an affirmation of presence. Throughout the 20th century, African Americans conceived various radical political paradigms to redefine their social positions and assert their humanity. Uka references these theories to show their commonplace, but also heightens relevant stylistic patterns and color to outline the beauty in their wistfulness. Uka moves beyond portraiture and examines fleeting gestures, where multiple figures appear in public spaces, away from their individualized interior environments. The patterns and backgrounds inspired by 70s wallpapers embellish the new settings, a nod to his previous works which similarly draw upon elements of clothing, dance and posture. The 70’s, although still alive in the memory of many, may be too far gone to have any relevance on the outlook and identities of people today, however they function to deviate from the conversation surrounding art and history which remain largely centered on authenticity, oppression, and pain. The stimulus of Uka’s practice comes from what he deems "the quantum leap", his necessary footstep into the unknown. These moments of nostalgia facilitate the continuity of identity, further persisting in his future work. The paintings showcase a nostalgia for life that is colorful and full of bliss. There continues to be space and yearning for joy, reflection, and redefinition.

Jerrell Gibbs

Sounds of Color: Recorded Memories



September 4, 2021 - October 22, 2021
Gibbs avails the new body of work as a point of departure to explore musicality in his compositions. As harmony is the basis of color theory and melody emulate the unity of color, the dynamic and symphony are defined through Gibb’s pictorial touch. Paying homage to the Impressionists, the paintings are vivid in pointillism, the oscillating contours of his paintings meld the skin tone and monochrome backgrounds into a modern sfumato.  The boy in all of the works represents a multitude of voices, ideas and ways of living. For the artist, the color, the ‘people of color’ portray the multiple and myriad of experiences and ideas that should be painted about, explored and shown. There is a continuation of gesture which acts as a thread between each work. Repetition is a constant throughout the paintings, resemblances are disposed in order to discover particularities of a memory. The recurrence of stroke join the colors with the repeated figure, as the artist uses repetition as a form of distinction. Visual and palette rhythms, cannot be replaced, echoing a secret vibration which animates profoundness. The fictional portraits mark a shift from his interest in acquainting the past, and instead reflect a pursuit of redefining representations. Figurative compositions explore contemporary identity to “change the narrative rather than repeat the renegade.” Gibbs attention lies in manifesting a youthful and revitalized future defined by schisms of contemporary Black solace.  Although no musical collaboration will accompany the paintings, Gibbs challenges himself to communicate the rhythmic energy present in his subjects and their environment. By implementing concepts of synesthesia, playing with textures and utilizing a bright selection of color, the vibrancy of the image protrudes from the canvas, awakening the gallery into a space of spontaneous leisure. Sounds of Color: Recorded Memories is his repartee, from exploring the legacies inherited through his family for generations, to how he attempts to define his own legacy and his own genre in art history.

Yukimasa Ida

Here and Now



June 26, 2021 - August 14, 2021
Mariane Ibrahim is pleased to announce the upcoming solo exhibition of Japanese artist Yukimasa Ida, entitled “Here and Now” on view, in Chicago, from June 26 – August 14, 2021. The show marks the artists debut in the United States. In the new body of work for “Here and Now”, Ida is focused on life and death as an eternal cycle and includes distorted portraits and bronze sculptures of human heads. Ida continues to experiment with spontaneous as well as intentional patterns. Each of his works merge various intensities of stroke, communicating specific ranges of emotion. Every piece embodies a snapshot of a memory, reflecting the way the human mind processes a fleeting moment…construed and inconsistent.

ruby onyinyechi amanze

Thinghood



May 7, 2021 - June 5, 2021
The show will be on view from May 7 – June 5, 2021 and will present seven new drawings. To make these works, over twenty-five different drawings were created, then cut and systematically reassembled into their finished form. amanze is currently working with a newly reduced capsule of seven recurring elements that include: swimming pools, ada and audre - who masquerade as swimmers/divers, dancers and pseudo lovers - windows and other architectural references, okada [motorcycle taxis], pigeons in flight and the paper itself. amanze speaks lovingly of each of the elements as individual forms. Now having isolated them from their former cohort, they take on new meaning as the ones that stayed. Human-like beings and inanimate objects ultimately share the same function; flat forms that interact and move [play] in endless configurations to create a multi-dimensional and therefore, illogical space. amanze’s drawings are an illusion; a suggestion of an expansive unnamed world situated between nowhere and everywhere. Primarily using graphite, fluorescent inks and photo transfers, each layer of space within the drawing has, with calculation and spontaneity, been negotiated, constructed and ultimately invented. To build upon the layering of space within the drawing, amanze has begun to explore a process of creating a final work that consists of overlapping multiple sheets of paper. Taking this one step further and embracing the puzzle-like element of parts within a whole, the drawings In Thinghood come together towards the end of the process. amanze removed any semblance of knowing in advance what the works would be and opened an organic dialogue with the drawings about what they could become. With almost thirty separate units to compose with, there are virtually infinite possibilities to bend planes and disrupt logic.

Sergio Lucena

The Blue that embraces me...



March 12, 2021 - April 10, 2021
The Blue that embraces me...highlights the silent essence that illuminates the memory of such things that, individually and intimately, bring us back to ourselves. These seminal landscapes seek to identify the contours of life, presenting a kind of tracing of the soul as the artist views his work as a spiritual language, a way to see life as a sacred experience of interrelations. The show marks a defining moment in the artists career as Lucena’s artistic production is moving toward a wider understanding of “limit” as a concept. The limit being both the environs that define a space and those naturally perceived. As a painter, Lucena felt the need to run against the limits of language. The duplicity of these slivers of light is the boundary that invites us to extend beyond the previously established liminal environments and spatial interstices to expand our point of view and create a new and unanticipated permeance.

Raphaël Barontini

The Night of the Purple Moon



January 30, 2021 - March 6, 2021
The Night of the Purple Moon, marks the gallery’s inaugural presentation with the artist and his first solo gallery show in the United States. The gallery will be transformed into a Galerie des Illustres, an otherworldly environment with large scale portraits on canvas, cloaks, chaps and flags. Fictional heroes and historical reinterpretations embellish subjects from classical and canonical histories: from the Caribbean, Voodoo and magical deities, to function as a way for formerly enslaved humans to hold on to their African identity, despite the violence of Western colonialism. Barontini illuminates disparities in the visual and cultural history of the French Caribbean, which is rooted in African ancestry, yet virtually saturated with culture of an insular Caribbean.