Skip to main content
600 Washington Square South
Philadelphia, PA 19106
215 629 1000
Founded in 1968, Locks Gallery actively represents an international group of critically respected contemporary artists working in a variety of disciplines. The exhibition program is a diverse combination of fresh perspectives on 20th century masters, showcases of Philadelphia talent, and new bodies of work from a core group of acclaimed mid-career artists. With a sustained commitment to contextualizing the work exhibited, the gallery regularly publishes illustrated catalogs and monographs with scholarly essays and hosts public programs such as artist talks, panel discussions, and gallery walkthroughs. A collaboration with the artist or their estate is at the core of each exhibition, allowing the gallery to present original programming. The staff cultivates long-standing relationships with individuals and institutions, fostering a new climate for contemporary art collecting in the city of Philadelphia. Locks Gallery was founded in 1968 as the Marian Locks Gallery and became known for building a national audience for the work of living Philadelphia artists. Now under the direction of Sueyun Locks, the gallery continues to highlight local talent with a strong focus on women artists, alongside national and international artists.
Artists Represented:
Ann Agee
the Estate of Edna Andrade
Polly Apfelbaum
Jennifer Bartlett
Lynda Benglis
Kate Bright
the Estate of Thomas Chimes
Neysa Grassi
Ellen Harvey
Nadia Hironaka and Matthew Suib
Jane Irish
Virgil Marti
Sarah McEneaney
John Moore
Elizabeth Osborne
Warren Rohrer
David Row
Pat Steir
Eve Sussman
Rob Wynne
Yeesookyung
Works Available By:
Richard Artschwager
Donald Baechler
Louise Bourgeois
Alexander Calder
Willem de Kooning
Nancy Graves
Howard Hodgkin
Ralph Humphrey
Bryan Hunt
Alex Katz
Ray Metzker
Robert Motherwell
Elizabeth Murray
Alice Neel
Louise Nevelson
Isamu Noguchi
Robert Rauschenberg
the Estate of George Segal
Alyson Shotz
Frank Stella
Betty Woodman
Robert Rahway Zakanitch
and others

 

 
Ellen Harvey, Arcadia, 2012 Installation Shot
Lynda Benglis, Everything Flows Installation shot, 2013
Jennifer Bartlett, In the Garden installation shot, 2014
Polly Apfelbaum and Lynda Benglis, Free Fall Installation Shot, 2015
David Row, Zen Road Signs, 2017
Louise Nevelson, Symphony of Ambient Forms Installation Image, 2016
Jennifer Bartlett, Installation 2017
Gallery Facade, 600 Washington Square South, Philadelphia
> <


 
Current Exhibition

Sarah McEneaney

Callowhill

600 Washington Square South
Philadelphia, PA 19106

April 5, 2019 - May 11, 2019

 
Past Exhibitions

Sarah McCoubrey

Centennial

600 Washington Square South
Philadelphia, PA 19106

February 22, 2019 - March 29, 2019

David Hartt & Tim Portlock

Fallow Fate

600 Washington Square South
Philadelphia, PA 19106

February 22, 2019 - March 29, 2019

David Hartt // Tim Portlock

Fallow Fate

600 Washington Square South
Philadelphia, PA 19106

February 15, 2019 - March 29, 2019
Artists David Hartt and Tim Portlock transcribe their worlds, creating complex narratives that address global exchange, racial tension, and the physical and sociological effects of failed modernist projects. Man-made deterioration is juxtaposed with representations of sublime and persistent nature—creating images of startling elegance despite their crumbling subjects. Atmosphere and ideology frame fraught narratives of white flight, urban planning, and socioeconomic stratification—issues which have been endemic to social design since the nineteenth century, but which were exacerbated throughout the economic booms and busts of the mid-to-late-twentieth century. Picturing the banal landscape of industrial decline, both Hartt and Portlock reassert the distance from which most individuals will view these problems. In scenes at once devoid of human life and irreparably changed by human hands, these artists call attention to the cyclical entropy of humanity on a global scale while also rendering beauty into these abandoned environments. Fallow Fate provides a valence through which we might view stasis as a point of recovery.

Sarah McCoubrey

Centennial

600 Washington Square South
Philadelphia, PA 19106

February 15, 2019 - March 29, 2019
In her latest series of paintings, Sarah McCoubrey captures the eerie magnificence of a generation that stands between two times—rooted in the last breaths of manual traditions carried from the nineteenth century, but charging toward the machine acceleration of the modern era. McCoubrey articulates the valor and brutality of World War I through the lace-maker’s painstaking language of a traditionally feminine craft. After beginning a sabbatical abroad in Belgium in 2014, at the cusp of the centennial of World War I, McCoubrey became enraptured by the the delicate beauty of Belgian lacework and the conflict’s effect on an artistry devastated by the wartime rationing of linen. McCoubrey’s fine calligraphic strokes revive the ancestral folk medium to weave a narrative which invokes feminine creativity—forging elegant lace lines in gouache to depict stoic wooden ships, hooded gas masks adorning the solemn figures of soldiers, and intricate domestic motifs grounded on repurposed butter papers: the relics of rationing. Centennial pays reverence to a period, perhaps not so far gone, when time might have moved differently between letters from the front, the delicate handicraft of items made in the home, and the slow glide of ships across the sea.

Jennifer Bartlett

In the Garden: Strange Holiday (1980-83)

600 Washington Square South
Philadelphia, PA 19106

January 4, 2019 - February 9, 2019
During the winter of 1979–80, Jennifer Bartlett traded homes with British novelist Piers Paul Read, exchanging her SoHo loft for a mediocre villa in Nice far from the famed seafront which had inspired the paintings of Matisse, Bonnard, Renoir, and Picasso. The series borne of this disappointing tourism, In the Garden, reinvigorated her practice and captured the myriad of natural forces and emotional states that she experienced during her stay. The fluency with which Bartlett transcribed the emotive potential of an otherwise desolate scene and the deftness of her mark-making prompted a 1983 review in Time Magazine where Robert Hughes proclaimed Bartlett to be a “connoisseur of unease,” because she simultaneously captured the banality of her surroundings while developing a forensic antidote to the ennui of her generation. Locks Gallery is pleased to present a reconstitution of In the Garden that highlights the serialized nature of this body of work. In the Garden was produced first from life as roughly 200 hundred works on paper; later reinterpreted from photographs as prints and enamel plates; and finally resolved in large triptych and five-panel paintings. Strange Holiday is a showcase of this tremendous body of work, a testament to the Gallery’s long relationship with the artist, and a rare opportunity to encounter this touchstone of masterful drawings, pastels, plates and paintings in one place.

Elizabeth Osborne:

Homage To...

600 Washington Square South
Philadelphia, PA 19106

November 17, 2018 - December 29, 2018

Henri Matisse

Drawings and Prints

600 Washington Square South
Philadelphia, PA 19106

November 17, 2018 - December 29, 2018

Steir, Scully, Ufan, Frize, Armleder, Tomasko, Benning, Rohrer

Catch It and Lose It

600 Washington Square South
Philadelphia, PA 19106

October 5, 2018 - November 24, 2018
The past 60 years have seen the tide of abstract painting ebb and flow. Its time of death is called every few decades followed by a revival of representational art, the breakneck pace of technology, or the fickleness of the market. And yet, it is miraculously revived every so often—ostensibly for the first time. In its ineffability, it resists communion with contemporary fashion—refusing to serve as a cultural mirror or temporal guide. It is a language forged through materiality, negotiated agency, and distance. As a genre, “abstract painting” connects a rich genealogy of artists united by an ever-evolving syntax of vernaculars that weave a grand tradition only to splinter and reknot in unknowable formation. Taking its name from the work of early 20th century British poet, artist, and futurist, Mina Loy, Catch It & Lose It seeks a space between certainty and ambiguity, allowing the astonishing breadth of contemporary abstraction to propagate unhindered.

Anni Albers, Edna Andrade, Dadamaino

OPTICAL // OBSTACLE

600 Washington Square South
Philadelphia, PA 19106

October 5, 2018 - November 10, 2018
Anni Albers (1899 - 1994), Edna Andrade (1917 - 2008), and Dadamaino (1930 - 2004) each made outstanding contributions to the evolution of postwar abstraction during a period in which innovations by female artists were eclipsed by those of their male counterparts. Optical // Obstacle brings together works of art by these three pioneering female artists active around the mid-twentieth century.

Kate Bright

Soft Estate

600 Washington Square South
Philadelphia, PA 19106

September 7, 2018 - September 29, 2018

John Moore

Counterpoint

600 Washington Square South
Philadelphia, PA 19106

August 20, 2018 - September 29, 2018