260 Utah Street
San Francisco, CA 94103
415 495 5454
Artists Represented:
Rina Banerjee
Jim Campbell
Julie Chang
Russell Crotty
Reed Danziger
Anoka Faruqee
Jutta Haeckel
Tim Hawkinson
Andrea Higgins
Christian Houge
Birgit Jensen
Isabella Kirkland
Stefan Kürten
Michael Light
Crystal Liu
Bernard Lokai
Emil Lukas
Marco Maggi
Ben McLaughlin
John O'Reilly
Driss Ouadahi
Patricia Piccinini
Nicole Phungrasamee Fein
Liliana Porter
Angelina Pwerle
Alan Rath
Lordy Rodriguez
Gideon Rubin
Surabhi Saraf
Andrew Schoultz
Cornelius Völker
William T. Wiley
Works Available By:


 
Current Exhibition

Patricia Piccinini

Inter-natural

260 Utah Street
San Francisco, CA 94103

December 1, 2018 - January 26, 2019
In her second solo exhibition at Hosfelt Gallery, Patricia Piccinini presents an immersive installation of hyper-realistic sculptures probing the increasingly permeable boundaries of humanness.

 
Past Exhibitions

Cornelius Völker

260 Utah Street
San Francisco, CA 94103

October 13, 2018 - November 21, 2018

Marco Maggi

SUPRA muro

260 Utah Street
San Francisco, CA 94103

September 8, 2018 - September 6, 2018

Janine Antoni, Rina Banerjee, Louise Bourgeois, Julian Charrière, Edmund Clark, Bruce Conner, Russell Crotty, Tim Hawkinson, Isabella Kirkland, Barbara Kruger, Michael Light, John O’Reilly, Patricia Piccinini, Alan Rath, Kiki Smith, Surabhi Saraf and Cornelius Völker

Frankenstein’s Birthday Party

260 Utah Street
San Francisco, CA 94103

June 23, 2018 - August 11, 2018
2018 is the bicentennial of Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley’s novel, Frankenstein; or, The Modern Prometheus. Why does a 200-year-old ghost story continue to feel so relevant? It’s important to remember that the Frankenstein of Hollywood and pop culture – Boris Karloff, The Munsters or Rocky Horror Picture Show – is quite different from the novel. Beyond the fact that the tale has captured popular imagination, the novel’s lasting impact is grounded in the fact that it is a parable about human nature. And the most important question it asks is who is the real monster? The exhibition begins, as it must, with contemporary artists looking at the body and our attempts to conquer death; advances in science and technology; the animation of objects or machines and artificial intelligence. Thence comes an examination of ambition that outstrips the ability to understand or control what we’ve created and finally, what happens when we don’t take responsibility for the consequences of our actions. Central to both the novel and the curatorial stance of this exhibition is the failure to feel empathy for the ostensibly unlovable — the other. Who is to blame for the rage born of feelings of rejection and how do we expect that anger to play out in society?

Emil Lukas

Twin Orbit

260 Utah Street
San Francisco, CA 94103

May 5, 2018 - June 16, 2018
Emil Lukas’ exquisitely strange and phenomenological objects are meditations on the way we perceive the world. “We’re affected by lots of things that are larger than us — things we don’t normally know how to see — for example the laws of physics,” says Lukas. “I’m attempting to make the invisible, visible.” Labor-intensive and experimental, playful and poetic, surprising and delightful, Lukas’ sculptures and sculptural paintings grow out of investigations into gravity, perspective, mathematics, color theory and the properties of light. Round “paintings” — actually parabolic bowls with tens of thousands of colored threads stretched across — manipulate our sense of space and definition of color. Chunky, plaster works composed of honeycombs of multi-colored pixels create optically vibrating fields, their convex surfaces disrupting our perception of depth. And the centerpiece of the exhibition, a monumental, pixilated, aluminum lens, both restricts and restructures our line of sight. This exhibition is an examination of seeing, where optics — the study of sight and the behavior of light — is a metaphor for the human ability to derive insight from abstract concepts. “We have two eyes and they are set into our heads in a way that determines our reality — our perspective. Those notions of the way the world exists are what I’m trying to upend.” Emil Lukas was born in Pittsburgh, PA. He has exhibited extensively internationally and has been collected by, among many others, the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art and the Anderson Collection. Lukas has been represented by Hosfelt Gallery since 2006. This is our sixth solo exhibition together.

Anoka Faruqee

structural color

260 Utah Street
San Francisco, CA 94103

March 17, 2018 - April 28, 2018
In Anoka Faruqee’s sixth exhibition at Hosfelt Gallery, she collaborates with her partner David Driscoll to present new paintings from their Circle series. These works exploit the optical complexity of interference created through the layering of misaligned patterns — turning what is considered a corruption in digital imagery into a source of prismatic luminosity and uncanny volumetric effects. Developing out of Faruqee’s earlier Moiré series, these new paintings adhere to the consistent structural format of concentric circles. Created with notched tools raked through wet paint, their digital/mechanical appearance belies the rigorous hand-made process, but human gesture and imperfection are apparent through interruption, errata, and the thick flows of paint dripping around the edges. The ultimate chromatic and spectral effects are unpredictable and only fully reveal themselves once each work is complete. The fusion of patterns and colors creates an ephemeral condition in which the vibrations of light and hue continually change with the movement of the viewer. Moirés have a stubborn logic that parallels various phenomena in the physical world, such as wave formations, stress patterns, and magnetic fields. The overlay and subsequent visual fusion of two or more offset patterns creates another pattern that is quite unlike and much more complex than any of the components. In this group of works, this phenomenon of interference not only exemplifies the plasticity of perception, but also models the dynamism of the physical world. Anoka Faruqee was born in Ann Arbor, Michigan and directs graduate studies in painting and printmaking at Yale School of Art. David Driscoll was born in Wintersville, Ohio. They live and work in New Haven, CT.

Gideon Rubin

The Kaiser’s Daughter

260 Utah Street
San Francisco, CA 94103

March 17, 2018 - April 28, 2018
Most of the paintings in Gideon Rubin’s sixth solo exhibition with Hosfelt Gallery were selected from work made for an exhibition at the Freud Museum in London. As source material, Rubin — an Israeli living in London whose work always refers to found images — mined photographs illustrating a serialized English-language edition of Mein Kampf that was published in 1939, the same year that Rubin’s grandparents, like Sigmund Freud, fled Europe to escape Nazi persecution. Rubin’s characteristic manner of painting – with his subjects reduced to a few adept brushstrokes in a minimal color palette — renders his imagery simultaneously straightforward and ambiguous. They read like a flash of memory at the point of fading completely, a dream, or a history known only through re-telling. Other paintings in this exhibition refer to Andrei Tarkovsky’s 1975 experimental film, The Mirror, a non-linear, autobiographical masterpiece known for the poetry of its cinematography. Central to the work of the three — Freud, Tarkovsky and Rubin — is the slipperiness of human memory and the importance of seeking clues in the past to decipher and resolve the issues of the present. Gideon Rubin was born in Tel Aviv, Israel, and lives in London. He received his MFA from Slade School of Fine Art, University College, London. His work has been exhibited extensively internationally.

Angelina Pwerle

260 Utah Street
San Francisco, CA 94103

January 27, 2018 - March 10, 2018
Angelina Pwerle’s subtly shifting, abstract paintings come out of a history of Aboriginal art-making that is thousands of years old. Yet audiences of contemporary art will find reference points in the spatial complexity of Jackson Pollock, optical intensity of Bridget Riley, technical elegance of Vija Celmins or meditative process of Agnes Martin. Using the fine point of a bamboo stick, Pwerle paints masses of minute, individual dots that float, cloud-like, on a colored ground, shifting and vibrating within an indeterminate spatial plane, to depict the Bush Plum Dreaming narrative. To Aboriginal people, “Dreaming” describes not only the creation of the earth and every life form, but provides the framework for human experience in the universe and the harmonious order of all things. The Bush Plum is a shrub found in dry Northern and Central Australia that because of its significance as a food source, is a totem with an associated Dreaming story. Pwerle’s representation of that narrative – formally sophisticated and dazzlingly transcendent — goes beyond cultural specificity, ethnographic stereotype or art historical precedent — to describe our place in the universe. Angelina Pwerle was born in 1946 in Utopia, Australia – Aboriginal freehold land north east of Alice Springs. Her paintings are in the collections of the National Gallery of Australia, Canberra; the Art Gallery of South Australia, Adelaide; the National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne; the Queensland Art Gallery/Gallery of Modern Art, Queensland; and The National Museum of Art, Osaka, Japan. This is Pwerle’s second solo exhibition at Hosfelt Gallery.

Birgit Jensen

What a Perfect Combination

260 Utah Street
San Francisco, CA 94103

January 27, 2018 - March 10, 2018
In her first solo exhibition in the United States, German artist Birgit Jensen looks to the history of the landscape in painting to examine the role of artifice in our never-ending pursuit of perfection. Made without a brush, Jensen’s paintings are meticulously and labor-intensively constructed to look as if they were created digitally. The “hand” of the artist is completely invisible. Superseding the brushstroke, Jensen applies multiple layers of screened paint to represent the pixilated matrices that compose digital imagery – the signifier of the electronic and impeccable. Referring primarily to the woodcuts of the Edo Period Japanese artist Katsushika Hokusai, but also to the 19th century Romantic, Caspar David Friedrich, as well as Vija Celmins, Thomas Ruff and Gerhard Richter, Jensen’s paintings appear at first to be realistic representations of nature. But they are in fact poetic constructs, composed of many images and places stitched together to create the illusion of an ideal. For Jensen and her predecessors, such imagined theatricality is a stratagem for seducing the viewer and transporting them toward the sublime. Jensen is interested in exploring the shift away from the physical and the natural toward the manufactured and virtual, as more and more aspects of our lives are constructed or designed, and more and more knowledge is gained through media instead of reality or experience. This move looks likely to accelerate. And as that paradigm changes, so do our notions of the meaning of perfection, the ideal and the transcendent.

Andrew Schoultz

Illuminated Opposition

260 Utah Street
San Francisco, CA 94103

December 16, 2017 - January 20, 2018
Reception: Saturday, December 16, 4-6 pm Andrew Schoultz brings his signature street-savvy style to a new body of work that questions the meaning and function of public space and the nature of political discourse. With an emphasis on the formal vocabulary of abstraction, Schoultz exposes the ways in which meaning is manipulated and perception skewed as the locus for civic debate has shifted from the town plaza to the isolated, anonymous realm of cyberspace. Two monumental sculptures anchor the installation, surrounded by murals painted directly on the walls of the gallery, paintings on panel and paper, and other sculptural objects. In a new series of abstract paintings, Schoultz distills some of his familiar stylistic elements into a more formal language with subtler allusions. Other works incorporate new symbolic motifs with multiple, sometimes conflicting meanings. As an example, the snake features prominently. Depending upon your cultural heritage, religious beliefs, or political persuasion, it can denote fertility, transformation, protection, wisdom, eternity, healing, anti-government resistance, racism, treachery or original sin. In the age of Trump, truth is a questionable commodity, peddled like a trinket for short-term gain. Is this really a new phenomenon, or simply one that has emerged brazenly from the shadows, to operate with impunity in the full light of day? Schoultz’s work situates itself squarely within current socio-political concerns, illuminating the battleground of a sharply divided country. Andrew Schoultz was born in Milwaukee, Wisconsin in 1975 and currently resides in Los Angeles. A major solo exhibition occupying the entire museum was presented by the Monterey Art Museum in 2013, and Schoultz is currently preparing for a solo exhibition at the Fort Wayne Museum of Art in Indiana in 2018. He has painted outdoor murals worldwide, including most recently in Beirut, Manila, San Francisco, Los Angeles and Toronto. His work is in the collections of the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, Berkeley Art Museum, Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Museum of Contemporary Art, San Diego, and many others. This is his second solo exhibition at Hosfelt Gallery.