Skip to main content
260 Utah Street
San Francisco, CA 94103
415 495 5454
Artists Represented:
Rina Banerjee
Jim Campbell
Julie Chang
Russell Crotty
Reed Danziger
Anoka Faruqee
Jutta Haeckel
Tim Hawkinson
Andrea Higgins
Christian Houge
Birgit Jensen
Isabella Kirkland
Stefan Kürten
Michael Light
Crystal Liu
Bernard Lokai
Emil Lukas
Marco Maggi
Ben McLaughlin
John O'Reilly
Driss Ouadahi
Patricia Piccinini
Nicole Phungrasamee Fein
Liliana Porter
Angelina Pwerle
Alan Rath
Lordy Rodriguez
Gideon Rubin
Surabhi Saraf
Andrew Schoultz
Cornelius Völker
William T. Wiley
Works Available By:


 

 


 
Current Exhibition

Bernard Lokai

Bernard Lokai: New Paintings

260 Utah Street
San Francisco, CA 94103

May 11, 2019 - July 3, 2019
Opening reception for the artist: Saturday, May 11 from 3 – 5 PM In two distinct bodies of work, German painter Bernard Lokai explores the seemingly infinite possibilities of paint applied to canvas. The first body of work, which he calls Landscape Blocks, is comprised of grids of 12 x 16 inch panels in which he both refers to and disrupts the history of painting. Each panel is a stand-alone abstract work. Some of them clearly allude to recognizable conventions, techniques or even specific artists, while others undermine those connections and still others have no recognizable precedent. He then arranges (and sometimes spends years rearranging) them into grids of 18 to 33 components, which together form the impression of a landscape. The tension between abstraction and representation operates as a metaphor for philosophical examinations of appearance and disappearance, permanence and impermanence, creation and destruction. Individual large canvases form the second body of work. These make room for bold expressions of color and mark-making and often combine multiple painting techniques within a single work. From sprayed neon acrylics to thickly applied, gestural brushstrokes in oil, Lokai’s purpose is neither to express emotion nor reference a particular subject. Rather, his practice ceaselessly probes the traditions and tropes of painting in unbounded pursuit of latent meanings and potential. Bernard Lokai was born in 1960 in Bohumín, Czechoslovakia. After his parents escaped from the former Czechoslovakia, Lokai grew up in Düren, Germany. He studied at the Kunstakademie Düsseldorf under Gerhard Richter and now resides in Düsseldorf.

 
Past Exhibitions

William T. Wiley

SCULPTURE, EYES WEAR TUG ODD

260 Utah Street
San Francisco, CA 94103

March 23, 2019 - May 4, 2019
William T. Wiley is one of the most influential American artists to come out of the San Francisco Bay Area. His third solo exhibition at Hosfelt Gallery reflects the importance of what is perhaps the least known aspect of his output—sculpture—through a range of works spanning the last six decades. Defined and unified by a visual vocabulary of repeating motifs combined with cunning word play, Wiley’s is an open-ended investigation into the moral issues of the global citizen. He masterfully assembles found objects and common materials upon which he inscribes enigmatic malapropisms, puns and double entendre, crafting strange objects with uncanny psychological weight. But the “gee-shucksness” of the media and frontier-plainness of the poetry are the spoons-full-of-sugar employed by a philosopher/poet of the most sophisticated order. Wiley’s riddle-filled assemblages, like his paintings on canvas and paper, are the empathetic musings of one particularly tuned into the absurdity of the human condition. William T. Wiley was born in 1937 and moved to San Francisco in 1956 to attend the San Francisco Art Institute (then the California School of Fine Arts). He completed his MFA in 1962, then taught at UC Davis, where he, along with Wayne Thiebaud, Robert Arneson, Roy De Forest, and Manuel Neri, transformed what was known as an agricultural college into one of the most important art schools of the 1960s and 1970s. In 2009 the Smithsonian American Art Museum mounted a retrospective of Wiley’s work that traveled to the Berkeley Art Museum in 2010. In 2013 Wiley was the subject of a major solo exhibition at the Fondazione Marconi in Milan. During the 2013 Venice Biennale, Wiley’s work was included in the Prada Foundation’s remake of the legendary exhibition, When Attitude Becomes Form, originally curated by Harald Szeemann at the Bern Kunsthalle, Switzerland in 1969. Wiley’s paintings, works on paper, sculptures and films are in the permanent collections of prominent public and private collections worldwide.

Russell Crotty

Bordering the Habitable Zone

260 Utah Street
San Francisco, CA 94103

February 2, 2019 - March 16, 2019
Internationally recognized for his innovative drawing practice, Russell Crotty presents a new body of work that combines his fascination with space exploration and concerns about environmental degradation from the viewpoint of an accomplished amateur astronomer, passionate surfer and native Californian. The central motif of this exhibition is imagined planetary landers—representing the thrill and promise of exploration as well as the perils our world faces. Informed by his own observational experience and that of scientists who surmise worlds that might exist beyond our own, his robotic explorers navigate hostile, submarine-like environments awash in toxic Kool-Aid-colored atmospheres. But their whimsical, futuristic architecture also recalls the optimism of mid-century California design, the Googie architecture of John Lautner, Oscar Niemeyer and Eero Saarinen, and Hanna Barbera’s influential animation, The Jetsons. Like the fastidiously inked globes for which he became famous, Crotty’s new work is equally object and drawing. Meticulous depictions of rockets, celestial bodies, smoke stacks and planetary landscapes are collaged to build the structure of the rovers, which are then embedded in bio-resin—a technique similar to that used in finishing surfboards. Despite this reference to “finish fetish,” he incorporates enough chance in these works to suggest the unintended consequences of humanity’s (mis)use of our planet and the unknowable results of exploration. Russell Crotty (b. 1956) was born and raised in the San Francisco Bay area. He lived and worked between Southern and Northern California for many years and now resides in the Ojai Valley. He received his BFA from the San Francisco Art Institute and his MFA from the University of California, Irvine. His work has been exhibited extensively internationally and collected by The Museum of Modern Art and the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, SFMoMA, the San Francisco Fine Arts Museums, the Centre Pompidou in Paris and many others. A two-year residency in 2016/2017 at Lick’s Mount Hamilton Observatory, a research facility managed by the University of California Santa Cruz, culminated in a solo exhibition at the San Jose Institute of Contemporary Art entitled “Looking Back in Time: Russell Crotty and Lick Observatory.”

Michael Light

Great Basin Autoglyphs and Pleistoseas

260 Utah Street
San Francisco, CA 94103

February 2, 2019 - March 16, 2019
In his eighth solo exhibition at Hosfelt Gallery, Michael Light presents a new body of work from his ongoing aerial photographic survey of the arid American West. Great Basin Autoglyphs and Pleistoseas ventures into deep time, moving from habited, placed settlements into pure space and its attendant emptiness. The resulting images are abstract and painterly investigations that reveal hitherto unseen terrain imprinted by both human intervention and geological phenomena. Twelve thousand years ago the Great Basin—that part of the country between California and Utah where water does not drain to the ocean—was 900 feet underwater, covered by two vast and now largely evaporated historical lakes, Bonneville and Lahontan. The remnants of Lake Bonneville today are the Great Salt Lake in Utah and its eponymous salt flats, while the most famous portion of the former Lake Lahontan is the Black Rock Desert in Nevada, an alkali bed that floods and dries each year, creating the flattest land on earth. It is also the location of the annual arts festival Burning Man. The topographies now exposed by both Pleistocene lakes are the entry points for Light as he continues to pursue themes of mapping, perceptual orientation, geology, and human impact on the land, but here in a more minimal and psychological way. Piloting his 600-pound aircraft at low elevations, he uses a large-format digital camera to capture the vast flatness of the former lakebeds, while back in the studio he applies a hyper-intensification process not unlike X-ray imaging or gravestone rubbing that results in the revelation of impressions, spaces and textures that are indiscernible to the naked eye. While Light has always pushed the boundaries of landscape photography, his approach with this body of work takes a deeper turn into graphic and emotional abstraction. Michael Light (b. 1963) is a Bay Area photographer, bookmaker, and pilot whose focus is the environment and how contemporary American culture relates to it. Light has exhibited globally and his work is in numerous museum collections including the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco, San Jose Museum of Art, Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Getty Research Institute, Los Angeles, Nevada Museum of Art, Reno, Brooklyn Art Museum, and the Victoria & Albert, London. His series FULL MOON is permanently displayed at the American Museum of Natural History in New York.

Patricia Piccinini

Inter-natural

260 Utah Street
San Francisco, CA 94103

December 1, 2018 - January 26, 2019
In her second solo exhibition at Hosfelt Gallery, Patricia Piccinini presents an immersive installation of hyper-realistic sculptures probing the increasingly permeable boundaries of humanness.

Cornelius Völker

260 Utah Street
San Francisco, CA 94103

October 13, 2018 - November 21, 2018

Marco Maggi

SUPRA muro

260 Utah Street
San Francisco, CA 94103

September 8, 2018 - September 6, 2018

Janine Antoni, Rina Banerjee, Louise Bourgeois, Julian Charrière, Edmund Clark, Bruce Conner, Russell Crotty, Tim Hawkinson, Isabella Kirkland, Barbara Kruger, Michael Light, John O’Reilly, Patricia Piccinini, Alan Rath, Kiki Smith, Surabhi Saraf and Cornelius Völker

Frankenstein’s Birthday Party

260 Utah Street
San Francisco, CA 94103

June 23, 2018 - August 11, 2018
2018 is the bicentennial of Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley’s novel, Frankenstein; or, The Modern Prometheus. Why does a 200-year-old ghost story continue to feel so relevant? It’s important to remember that the Frankenstein of Hollywood and pop culture – Boris Karloff, The Munsters or Rocky Horror Picture Show – is quite different from the novel. Beyond the fact that the tale has captured popular imagination, the novel’s lasting impact is grounded in the fact that it is a parable about human nature. And the most important question it asks is who is the real monster? The exhibition begins, as it must, with contemporary artists looking at the body and our attempts to conquer death; advances in science and technology; the animation of objects or machines and artificial intelligence. Thence comes an examination of ambition that outstrips the ability to understand or control what we’ve created and finally, what happens when we don’t take responsibility for the consequences of our actions. Central to both the novel and the curatorial stance of this exhibition is the failure to feel empathy for the ostensibly unlovable — the other. Who is to blame for the rage born of feelings of rejection and how do we expect that anger to play out in society?

Emil Lukas

Twin Orbit

260 Utah Street
San Francisco, CA 94103

May 5, 2018 - June 16, 2018
Emil Lukas’ exquisitely strange and phenomenological objects are meditations on the way we perceive the world. “We’re affected by lots of things that are larger than us — things we don’t normally know how to see — for example the laws of physics,” says Lukas. “I’m attempting to make the invisible, visible.” Labor-intensive and experimental, playful and poetic, surprising and delightful, Lukas’ sculptures and sculptural paintings grow out of investigations into gravity, perspective, mathematics, color theory and the properties of light. Round “paintings” — actually parabolic bowls with tens of thousands of colored threads stretched across — manipulate our sense of space and definition of color. Chunky, plaster works composed of honeycombs of multi-colored pixels create optically vibrating fields, their convex surfaces disrupting our perception of depth. And the centerpiece of the exhibition, a monumental, pixilated, aluminum lens, both restricts and restructures our line of sight. This exhibition is an examination of seeing, where optics — the study of sight and the behavior of light — is a metaphor for the human ability to derive insight from abstract concepts. “We have two eyes and they are set into our heads in a way that determines our reality — our perspective. Those notions of the way the world exists are what I’m trying to upend.” Emil Lukas was born in Pittsburgh, PA. He has exhibited extensively internationally and has been collected by, among many others, the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art and the Anderson Collection. Lukas has been represented by Hosfelt Gallery since 2006. This is our sixth solo exhibition together.

Anoka Faruqee

structural color

260 Utah Street
San Francisco, CA 94103

March 17, 2018 - April 28, 2018
In Anoka Faruqee’s sixth exhibition at Hosfelt Gallery, she collaborates with her partner David Driscoll to present new paintings from their Circle series. These works exploit the optical complexity of interference created through the layering of misaligned patterns — turning what is considered a corruption in digital imagery into a source of prismatic luminosity and uncanny volumetric effects. Developing out of Faruqee’s earlier Moiré series, these new paintings adhere to the consistent structural format of concentric circles. Created with notched tools raked through wet paint, their digital/mechanical appearance belies the rigorous hand-made process, but human gesture and imperfection are apparent through interruption, errata, and the thick flows of paint dripping around the edges. The ultimate chromatic and spectral effects are unpredictable and only fully reveal themselves once each work is complete. The fusion of patterns and colors creates an ephemeral condition in which the vibrations of light and hue continually change with the movement of the viewer. Moirés have a stubborn logic that parallels various phenomena in the physical world, such as wave formations, stress patterns, and magnetic fields. The overlay and subsequent visual fusion of two or more offset patterns creates another pattern that is quite unlike and much more complex than any of the components. In this group of works, this phenomenon of interference not only exemplifies the plasticity of perception, but also models the dynamism of the physical world. Anoka Faruqee was born in Ann Arbor, Michigan and directs graduate studies in painting and printmaking at Yale School of Art. David Driscoll was born in Wintersville, Ohio. They live and work in New Haven, CT.

Gideon Rubin

The Kaiser’s Daughter

260 Utah Street
San Francisco, CA 94103

March 17, 2018 - April 28, 2018
Most of the paintings in Gideon Rubin’s sixth solo exhibition with Hosfelt Gallery were selected from work made for an exhibition at the Freud Museum in London. As source material, Rubin — an Israeli living in London whose work always refers to found images — mined photographs illustrating a serialized English-language edition of Mein Kampf that was published in 1939, the same year that Rubin’s grandparents, like Sigmund Freud, fled Europe to escape Nazi persecution. Rubin’s characteristic manner of painting – with his subjects reduced to a few adept brushstrokes in a minimal color palette — renders his imagery simultaneously straightforward and ambiguous. They read like a flash of memory at the point of fading completely, a dream, or a history known only through re-telling. Other paintings in this exhibition refer to Andrei Tarkovsky’s 1975 experimental film, The Mirror, a non-linear, autobiographical masterpiece known for the poetry of its cinematography. Central to the work of the three — Freud, Tarkovsky and Rubin — is the slipperiness of human memory and the importance of seeking clues in the past to decipher and resolve the issues of the present. Gideon Rubin was born in Tel Aviv, Israel, and lives in London. He received his MFA from Slade School of Fine Art, University College, London. His work has been exhibited extensively internationally.