Skip to main content
The Fuller Building 41 East 57th Street, 9th Floor
New York, NY 10022
Appointment Recommended
212 535 8810
American paintings, drawings, and sculpture, 18th through early 20th century; European paintings, drawings, and sculpture, 19th and early 20th century; American furniture and decorative arts, 1810–40; American Aesthetic furniture and decorative arts, 1880–1900.
Artists Represented:
John James Audubon
Milton Avery
George Bellows
Thomas Hart Benton
Albert Bierstadt
George Caleb Bingham
Oscar F. Bluemner
William-Adolphe Bouguereau
Gustave Caillebotte
William Merritt Chase
Frederic Edwin Church
John Singleton Copley
John Rogers Cox
Edgar Degas
Ralph Earl
Thomas Eakins
Sanford Robinson Gifford
William Glackens
William Michael Harnett
Marsden Hartley
Childe Hassam
Martin Johnson Heade
Winslow Homer
Edward Hopper
George Inness
John Frederick Kensett
Blanche Lazzell
Henri Le Sidaner
William McCloskey
Claude Monet
Charles Willson Peale
James Peale
Raphaelle Peale
Jane Peterson
John Frederick Peto
Hiram Powers
Fairfield Porter
Maurice Prendergast
Winold Reiss
Pierre-Auguste Renoir
William Trost Richards
Severin Roesen
Augustus Saint-Gaudens
John Singer Sargent
Kay Sage
Charles Sheeler
Everett Shinn
Joseph Stella
Gilbert Stuart
Benjamin West
James Abbott McNeill Whistler
Worthington Whittredge
Andrew Wyeth
Works Available By:
John White Alexander
Milton Avery
Cecilia Beaux
Frank Weston Benson
Albert Bierstadt
Maurice Boutet de Monvel
Mary Cassatt
John Singleton Copley
Stuart Davis
Ralph Earl
Suzy Frelinghuysen
Frederick Carl Frieseke
William Glackens
Francis Guy
James Guy
William Michael Harnett
Childe Hassam
Martin Johnson Heade
Robert Henri
Winslow Homer
Everett Gee Jackson
David Johnson
John Frederick Kensett
Fitz Henry Lane
Reginald Marsh
William McCloskey
Anna Mary Robertson Moses
John Frederick Peto
Maurice Prendergast
William Trost Richards
John Singer Sargent
Gilbert Stuart
Benjamin West

 

 
Hirschl & Adler Galleries 2 © Eric W. Baumgartner 2014
Hirschl & Adler Galleries 3 © Eric W. Baumgartner 2014
Hirschl & Adler Galleries © Eric W. Baumgartner 2014
Hirschl & Adler Galleries 1 © Eric W. Baumgartner 2014
> <


 
Current Exhibition

See Verso: A Guide To Looking Back



May 30, 2024 - July 3, 2024
“See Verso” is most often seen in the registration notes for a work of art. Labels, inscriptions, and dates find themselves grouped in with this term to describe the contents found on the backs of pictures. But what does see verso mean when taken out of this literal context? It is an indication that there is something more; you must look back to produce something new. See Verso: A Guide to Looking Back showcases an eclectic group of modern and contemporary artists who look back to their art predecessors as a means of fully understanding them. Each work in "See Verso" possesses a unique mythic quality. Greco-Roman classicism, the art historical canon, biblical narratives, and the natural world are adapted onto canvas and paper as allegories, symbols, and as subjects themselves. Through these references, the artists are inviting us to look to history’s so-called “end product” to examine the present, and in turn render it changeable. Perhaps these myths shift or challenge perceptions. Perhaps they heighten them. One thing is for certain: they ensure that history is not left in the past. Pictured: David Ligare, "Still Life with Polykleitian Head and Candles (Idea)," 2018.

 
Past Exhibition

The American Dream: Seven Decades of Reality and Imagination in American Art



May 1, 2021 - June 11, 2021
"The American Dream" derives from the title of an enigmatic painting from 1935 by the Magic Realist O. Louis Guglielmi, one of the centerpieces of the exhibition. The Guglielmi is accompanied by several new acquisitions making their exhibition début, including some great works of art from multi-generational private collections. Among the most noteworthy is a magnificent sporting painting by Frank Benson, "Redheads Lighting," which has been in one family's collection since the patriarch acquired it from Benson—his friend and hunting companion—in the mid-1920s. Another recent acquisition is a magical 1949 watercolor by Charles Burchfield called "Cobwebs in Autumn," which was acquired by the father of its current owner in the early 1950s, perhaps as a tangible memento of his undergraduate honors thesis on Burchfield at Harvard University in 1942—the first at the university treating a living artist.