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WINDOW by Anton Kern Gallery
91 Walker St.
New York, New York 10013
2123679663

Also at:
16 East 55th Street
New York, NY 10022
212 367 9663
Artists Represented:
Nobuyoshi Araki 
Margot Bergman 
Ellen Berkenblit 
John Bock 
David Byrd 
Brian Calvin 
Anne Collier 
Julie Curtiss 
Nathalie Du Pasquier 
Nicole Eisenman  
Martino Gamper 
Ellen Gronemeyer 
Bendix Harms 
Eberhard Havekost 
Lothar Hempel 
Richard Hughes 
Marcus Jahmal
Sarah Jones 
Hein Koh
Jim Lambie 
Marepe 
Chris Martin  
Matthew Monahan 
Aliza Nisenbaum 
Marcel Odenbach 
Manfred Pernice 
Alessandro Pessoli 
Tal R
Wilhelm Sasnal 
Lara Schnitger 
David Shrigley 
Francis Upritchard 
Eric van Lieshout 
Andy Warhol
Yuli Yamagata

 

 
Installation view, Alessandro Pessoli: Against Me. Courtesy Anton Kern Gallery.


 
Online Programming

Margot Bergman

Cups



Anton Kern Gallery is pleased to introduce a special group of works on paper by Margot Bergman, created between the 1980s – 1990s. Historically, teacups and other tabletop vessels have been depicted as static objects within a still life composition. In Bergman's works, the common cup is recast as the subject. Each cup is packed with its own unique personality, bursting with joy and motion. No longer relegated to the background, these wild forms dance with bold color and individualized adornments.

 
Current Exhibition

Gina Beavers, Ellen Berkenblit, Keith Boadwee, Hyegyeong Choi, Craig Drennen, Sean Fader, Magalie Guérin, Loie Hollowell, Hein Koh, Marilyn Minter, Ruby Neri, Lara Schnitger, David Shrigley, Betty Tompkins, and Ryan Wilde, curated by Brigitte Mulholland and Kristen Smoragiewicz

Peep Show



September 8, 2021 - October 31, 2021
Anton Kern Gallery invites you to visit our WINDOW space, 91 Walker Street at Lafayette, for a playful, slightly naughty peek into Peep Show, a group exhibition curated by Brigitte Mulholland and Kristen Smoragiewicz. Peep Show is visible from the street 24/7 through October 31.⁠

 
Past Exhibitions

Anne Collier



September 10, 2021 - October 23, 2021
Anton Kern Gallery is pleased to announce an exhibition of new work by the New York-based artist Anne Collier. This will be Collier’s sixth solo exhibition with the gallery. Over the past two decades Anne Collier has developed a complex body of work that considers our social and cultural relationships with images and with the medium of photography itself. Central to Collier’s ongoing project is a consideration of the emotional and psychological attachments we develop with images, and how these (auto)biographical narratives relate to photography’s inherent relationship with memory, melancholia and loss. At Anton Kern Gallery, Collier will present – for the first time in New York - works from her most recent series which has the collective title Filter (2019-). Collier’s Filter works expand upon her long-standing consideration of the analog photographic process and the mechanics at play in the production, construction and distribution of images. In the Filter works Collier starts with a greatly enlarged detail of an image of an emotionally distraught woman sourced from a vintage romance comic book. She then applies a Kodak Color Print Viewing Filter on top of these images, to create a series of ‘frames’ around the recurring or repeated images. The Kodak Color Print Viewing Filter was a pre-digital technical device designed to assist with color correction when making photographic prints in the darkroom. Collier’s resultant Filter works depict sequential images that suggest a liminal space somewhere between the photographic and the cinematic: between a still and a moving image. In foregrounding the photographic process in these works, and through her privileging of seriality, framing, cropping, and chromatic shifts Collier makes evident the manipulations inherent to the medium of photography itself. Alongside the works from the Filter series Collier will also present new works that further explore her interest in the aesthetics, language, and modus operandi of the self-help industries, as well as recent works from her ongoing Woman Crying and Woman Crying (Comic) series. Writing about the Woman Crying (Comic) series in 2018 the art historian Tom McDonough observed: “With these works we are in the realm of the extreme close-up … At this level of engagement, we become engrossed by the details of the printing process itself, with its separation and overlay of cyan, magenta, and yellow dots and its inky black that sits on top of these colors, defining contours and the dense thickets of eyelashes and brows. We even glimpse the grain of the cheap paper on which these panels were printed, losing ourselves between the heightened emotional state depicted, its stylized representation, and the mechanical means by which it has been reproduced.” Shot in the studio using a large-format analog camera, Collier’s work is informed as much by technical and commercial photography as by the work of the artists associated with the ‘Pictures’ generation. Throughout her work Collier seeks to privilege the relationship between gender and image-making, whilst simultaneously maintaining a tension between the ’objective’, almost forensic-like depiction of her subjects and the often fraught and highly emotive nature of the images and objects that she re-presents. Writing on the occasion of Collier’s 2018 survey exhibition at Hannover’s Sprengel Museum, curator Stefan Gronert summarized Collier’s approach thus: “Collier demonstrates the staging function of photography by way of deliberate enactment: with this duplication and enhancement she reveals the power of the image and the cultural channeling of the eye.”

Yuli Yamagata

Sweet Dreams, Nosferatu



September 10, 2021 - October 23, 2021
Anton Kern Gallery is pleased to present Sweet Dreams, Nosferatu, the Brazilian artist Yuli Yamagata’s first solo exhibition in New York. Yamagata’s concept for the exhibition is activated in two parts and across two geographic venues. Part one is hosted at the gallery in New York, and part two is staged at Passion For Beds, a mattress store located in Basel, Switzerland, as part of Art Basel Parcours. While Yamagata’s Nosferatu will be “sleeping” in a bed at the Basel mattress store, his dreams will spill out into his bedroom, and come to life at the gallery. A sculpture of a store-bought chicken with a chopstick antenna will inhabit both locations and act as a portal between the two time zones. The gallery exhibition consists of twenty new works, which operate as manifestations of Nosferatu’s unconscious desires and fears. Throughout the space are nine undulating fabric paintings, two wall-based reliefs, two wall-mounted sculptures, and seven freestanding sculptures supported by flexible aluminum armatures. Yamagata’s choice of materials provides sensory pleasures, with juxtapositions of batting-stuffed Lycra, velvet, and silk intermixed with found materials such as eyeglasses, corn husks, and dehydrated shrimp coated in resin. The body - both animal and human - is consistently referenced in the forms of bones, feet, claw-like hands, stuffed socks, intestine shaped coils, chicken parts, and fake eyeballs. Her fabrics act as skins, sometimes pierced or adorned with jewelry. Through her hyperbolic use of food and body parts in her sculptures, these elements become sympathetic characters, their positioning and colors evoking different emotions such as anger, sadness, excitement and foreboding. Bode (The Rolling Stones), the largest fabric painting in the exhibition, is inspired by a fan’s cover art for a remixed version of the group’s 1973 album Goats Head Soup. In the painting, a close-up of an evil goat head simultaneously repels the viewer and invites them to pet it. Disc shaped fields of tie dye patterns occupy the right half of the composition, creating an opposing force, contending to reach a balance. Yamagata plays with these dualities – drama and harmony, attraction and repulsion, sweet and sour – throughout the show. Yamagata’s sinuous free-standing sculptures evoke freehand drawings in space. Plant-like forms emerge out of resinous puddles conjuring visions of humans and monsters, a limbo environment between the mortal and immortal. The anthropomorphic Mr. Mister sculpture is a seated figure made up of bones and stained marijuana leaf patterned socks. Its green hand makes a beckoning gesture inviting us in for a closer look into a bowl of mysterious stew balanced at the top, where his head should be. In the green plaid fabric painting Teenagers, two mouths are entwined in a French kiss. Intermingled in the passionate scene are unsettling elements such as a bloodshot eyeball made of felt, and a cut-out portion of the canvas shaped like a drop of blood. A stuffed fabric coil draped over the top of the painting serves as a frame. The oil painting entitled Sweet Dreams, Nosferatu acts as a counterpart to the piece. Its film still composition portrays the erotically frightening moment just before Nosferatu sinks his teeth into the neck of a beautiful woman. Yamagata’s playful use of Pop culture references defangs the horror in her work, allowing the viewer to indulge in the absurd possibilities of dreamscapes. Her impure use of the vampire legend, dosed with a psychoanalytical approach and filtered through a psychedelic civ, addresses the pathos, humor, and hypocrisies of modern life. Through the framework of a dream, Yamagata provides a safe outlet for exploration of our dark fantasies without the consequences of reality. For additional images and information, please contact: press@antonkerngallery.com. Yuli Yamagata was born in São Paulo in 1989, where she continues to live and work. The artist graduated from the University of São Paulo with a BFA in sculpture, and has exhibited nationally and internationally since 2015. Yamagata will be featured in the 2021 edition of Art Basel Parcours, presenting a multidisciplinary installation in which she imagines Nosferatu’s bedroom and a night of wild dreams.

Pawel Althamer, Araki, Alvaro Barrington, Margot Bergman, Ellen Berkenblit, John Bock, David Byrd, Brian Calvin, Anne Collier, Nathalie Du Pasquier, Nicole Eisenman, Frank Escalet, Martino Gamper, Ellen Gronemeyer, Mark Grotjahn, Bendix Harms, Eberhard Havekost, Lothar Hempel, Richard Hughes, Sarah Jones, Hein Koh, Edward Krasinski, Mike Kuchar, Jim Lambie, Marepe, Chris Martin, Enrique Metinides, Matthew Monahan, Aliza Nisenbaum, Marcel Odenbach, Manfred Pernice, Alessandro Pessoli, Tal R, Wilhelm Sasnal, Lara Schnitger, Larry Shiveen, David Shrigley, Mike Silva, Francis Upritchard, Erik van Lieshout, Andy Warhol, Jonas Wood, Yuli Yamagata

Tales of Manhattan



July 8, 2021 - August 20, 2021
On the occasion of the 25th Anniversary of the gallery, we are excited to present a group exhibition celebrating the past, present, and future of Anton Kern Gallery with Tales of Manhattan, featuring: Pawel Althamer • Nobuyoshi Araki • Alvaro Barrington • Margot Bergman • Ellen Berkenblit • John Bock • David Byrd • Brian Calvin • Anne Collier • Julie Curtiss • Nicole Eisenman • Frank Escalet • Martino Gamper • Ellen Gronemeyer • Bendix Harms • Eberhard Havekost • Lothar Hempel • Richard Hughes • Sarah Jones • Hein Koh • Edward Krasiński • Mike Kuchar • Jim Lambie • Marepe • Chris Martin • Enrique Metinides • Matthew Monahan • Aliza Nisenbaum • Marcel Odenbach • Nathalie Du Pasquier • Manfred Pernice • Alessandro Pessoli • Tal R • Wilhelm Sasnal • Lara Schnitger • Larry Shiveen • David Shrigley • Mike Silva • Francis Upritchard • Erik van Lieshout • Andy Warhol • Mark Grotjahn & Jonas Wood • Yuli Yamagata

Genesis Belanger, Lauren Clay, Julie Curtiss, Carl D'Alvia, Nick Doyle, Martino Gamper, Adam Green, Henry Gunderson, Steven Junil Park, Clinton King, Hein Koh, Austin Lee, Richard McGuire, David Shrigley, Jessica Stoller, Ryan Wilde

The Shoo Sho, curated by Julie Curtiss



June 30, 2021 - August 31, 2021
Playing with the Anton Kern Gallery WINDOW space peculiarities -- a gallery that can only be seen from the outside and never entered -- and referencing its location in Lower Manhattan near Soho, Julie Curtiss has organized The Shoo Sho, inspired by the Shoe Store window displays that populate the area. With an array of works that riff on the concept of the shoe and its potential materials and display, the exhibition offers a quirky, diverse, and fun opportunity to contemplate the Shoo for both its ordinary purpose and its extraordinary form as a coveted and luxurious accessory.

Erik van Lieshout

Erik van Lieshout: Art Basel Art Blasé



May 20, 2021 - June 26, 2021
Anton Kern Gallery is thrilled to debut Erik van Lieshout’s film Art Basel (2019) in his new exhibition on the third floor, Art Basel Art Blasé. The film is accompanied by an installation of related paintings, drawings, collages, and sculptures, as well as a second film, Art Blasé (2020), a companion film to Art Basel that was made as a result of the pandemic, lockdown, and the cancellation of cruise ships, art fairs, travel, and normal life. In 2019 the artist was invited to be part of a special curated exhibition to take place in 2020, celebrating the 50th anniversary of Art Basel. Van Lieshout flew to Hong Kong in March of 2019 to start planning with the curators. One of them, Kaspar Koenig, suggested that he begin by going on a cruise, so the artist made his maiden voyage on the Holland-America line’s New Statendam ship in the summer of 2019, sailing up the coast of Norway for two weeks. The cruise made sense as a parallel to art fairs: the promise of wealth and leisure; a passenger’s only tasks to consume food and drink, walk around, and spend money; the impersonal nature of the ship resembling the booths and coffee stands that line a fair’s aisles. The original intent was to book three cruises around Europe, thus depicting the chaos of the area with Brexit, and especially the ecological protests against the omnipresence of cruise ships. Van Lieshout soon realized that the budget of the project was too limited for such an undertaking, and in the end it was the single cruise on the Holland-America Line’s newest ship, which housed a large art collection and had been baptized by Oprah Winfrey. The edit of the film was finished in February of 2020, and van Lieshout watched the news unfolding slowly...and then that cruise ships were one of the first places of corona infections. He immediately revisited the film footage and began shooting more in his studio. Van Lieshout remembered the towel animals that populated the cruise ship and began making them himself: elephants, swans, and monkeys, that the workers of the ship would leave in guest’s rooms. There had even been an event to teach people on the cruise how to make these towel animals, and an instructional book that van Lieshout had purchased. He made the towel animals, stop motion animations, performances, and collages as he contemplated the lockdown and isolation, and the environmental impact and consequences of all of those flights he had taken—4 days in Hong Kong, 2 days in Venice, 1 week in New York, 1 day in London—and felt ashamed. The resulting footage became a separate film, Art Blasé, a companion to the first film. First the 50th Anniversary exhibition was postponed, as Hong Kong, Basel, and Miami were cancelled. Then the project was cancelled entirely. The gallery is proud to debut the film here instead, in an immersive installation that resembles those art fairs. Says the artist, “It was all fucked up, and now the pandemic is still going on, but in no time the ships and Art Basel will be on track again.” Erik van Lieshout’s work has been internationally exhibited and collected. Large solo and group shows include MMK, Frankfurt (2019), Albertina Museum Vienna (2019), the South London Gallery (2017), Hannover Kunstverein (2017), Wiels Contemporary Art Centre, Brussels (2016), TENT Rotterdam, Pauluskerk, Rotterdam (2016), Tessaloniki Biennale, Tessaloniki (2015), Manifesta 10 St. Petersburg (2014), Center for Contemporary Culture - GCCC, Moscow (2014), Moscow Biennale, Moscow (2013), 55th Venice Biennale, Venice (2013), Manifesta 9 Genk (2012), Art Unlimited, Basel (2011), The Museum Boijmans van Beunigen, Rotterdam (2006) and many others. He was the recipient of the Heineken Art Prize in 2018 and a finalist for the Daniel & Florence Guerlain Contemporary art Foundation Drawing Prize 2021.

Bendix Harms

Bendix Harms: Houses of Content



May 20, 2021 - June 26, 2021
The fifth exhibition by German artist Bendix Harms at Anton Kern Gallery presents sixteen new paintings. Painted over the last year and a half in his studio in Østerfælden, the artist’s farm in the north of Denmark, they are the outcome of the life shared with his wife Mari, Mamon the cat, and a wide array of birds that settle around the farm. The exhibition will run through June 26 and is accompanied by a new 100-page catalog chronicling six exhibitions and including a dedication-poem by fellow painter Joe Bradley. Sixteen paintings equal sixteen Houses of Content. Harms could not be clearer about how to read his work. The paintings house the content, and the content determines the outcome of the paintings. They are the inevitable consequence of his engagement and, most of all, his close relationship with the subjects he paints. Calling himself a contentist Harms explains: “I am 1000% convinced that personal experiences will create strong relationships to the painted subjects. And from this moment on the motif begins to talk to the artist and the artist has to deliver adequate and art historically relevant answers, because at the end of an artist’s life only one thing matters: the difference of the own work in relation to history.” In an almost Warholian manner, yet completely un-dandy-ish, Harms withdraws from the role of the artist as genius inventor. Rather, he sees himself as an agent or intermediary between his subjects’ actions, the plays continuously acted out in front of his eyes, and the paintings to be painted. As if he was taking precise orders from his motif: do it this way! Østerfælden takes on the role of the factory, birds and cats are the Superstars, the artist becomes their extension, or as Harms put it “an employee of my subjects.” During the act of painting, the motif, rather than the artist, is the decision-maker. Method and content collapse into one! There is no distinction between form and content, and herein lies the extravagance and unmistakable character of Harms’ painting. The viewer will discover: the artist in his barn-studio, his body inhabited by cats, mice, and Mari in Used Contentist; a cat basking in its own outlandish vanity in Salon Mömske; the contrast between a strict government, under which it chronically feels like having one leg in prison, and the Danish Friday-evening-sweets-culture in ØFcatraz; Mamon the cat building a house from its own nick-names in Mamonhaus (House of Names); three painters, Mari, Dana and Nicole taking over the barn in House of Talentos (Mari, Dana, Nicole); Mamon building her house with compelling content: mice in House of Content (Multipuds); a flock of surviving migratory birds celebrating the sun in Fight for your Right to see the African Light; the artist caught in the dilemma of what was the spring of 2020 when the redstart bird arrived from the Sahara at Østerfælden and locked Harms into a prison of responsibility in AL-RED-CATRAZ (Prison of Spring). The recurring compositional device of the barn’s timber structure is a formal blueprint that was gifted to the artist by Rufus, the farm-cat (RIP) and former main subject, by revealing its favorite sleeping places in the beams. This structure, which may initially look like abstract painting, is the perfect scaffold for installing narrative subjects. This anchors the paintings, gives them scale and meaning. Along with the reduced pallet of just two or three colors as well as black and white, this validates the artist’s strong sense of economy of means and restraint from painterly self-absorption in favor of giving his subjects room to talk. It is the role of the artist to bring the subject to speak, adequately. In Harms’ words: “The motif is the conqueror and decision-maker and I’m expecting even more precise orders from my subjects in the future.” Bendix Harms was born in 1967 in Münster, Germany. He received his M.F.A in 1997 from the Hochschule für Bildende Künste in Hamburg. He has been the subject of solo exhibitions in Europe, LA and New York. His work is currently included in “Deep Blue” an exhibition curated by Katherine Bradford at the Hall Art Foundation in Reading, VT. Harms’ work is part of numerous public and private collections including Deutsche Bank Collection, Frankfurt, Germany; Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, NY; Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, CA; and San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, San Francisco, CA. The exhibition Houses of Content will be accompanied by a new 100-page catalog including images of six exhibitions and a dedication-poem by fellow painter Joe Bradley. Harms lives in Allerup, Denmark.

Brian Calvin, Marcus Jahmal, Calvin Marcus, Chris Martin

Brian Calvin Marcus Jahmal curated by Chris Martin



May 6, 2021 - June 27, 2021
Brian Calvin - Calvin Marcus - Marcus Jahmal - three painters with four names between them. I like the way their names fit together - it has a nice sound to it. Seemed like a good idea for a show. I’m friends with these guys - they’re all really interesting people. They are all dealing with the figure and they are all contemporaries. I’ve been in Marcus Jahmal’s Brooklyn studio a few times and there’s always a lot going on. There are paintings everywhere and drawings all over the floor. He paints at night and he knows how to use black. I used to see him on the street in this tiny black car he had with just two seats and I would jump in and continue the conversation and get a ride somewhere. I visited Calvin Marcus’ studio in LA and I remember a painting of horses in intense lime green with this stunning surface. He really knows how to put on paint. There was also this beautifully crafted sculpture of his studio building. Except that the actual building had a big hole in it covered with plywood and I asked what happened there and he said a car had just come racing around the corner and smashed right into the building and the nose of the car had stuck thru the wall exactly where his drawing desk was but luckily he wasn’t there drawing. I have never visited Brian Calvin’s studio in Ojai California but I am looking forward to it. Whenever I think of Ojai I think of Krishnamurti and all my books with photographs of his sublime face - delicate and sensual. Brian’s paintings of faces are powerful slabs of color so that a huge eye and a huge mouth dissolve into abstract shapes of luscious paint and then reappear as archetypal image. They don’t read as specific portraits but somehow they all seem like California kids to me. --Chris Martin

Alessandro Pessoli

Carousel



April 8, 2021 - May 15, 2021
Alessandro Pessoli Carousel April 8 – May 15, 2021 “In this new cycle of works, I tried to find a balance between drawing and painting. I looked for solutions on how to create, in the same image, the lightness of the drawing sketched into the shapes and the stratification of the painting, which is full of memories. These are imaginary portraits of male and female figures. The classic pose of the figures is contaminated by Disney characters and illustrations from William Blake’s Divina Commedia - a reshuffling of iconographies and symbologies. Flowers, apples, birds, skulls, swords, snakes, wings, and talons are some of the elements that accompany and characterize the figures. The title, Carousel, recalls the continuous rotating, going up and down - a play, an entertainment - it represents a way to outline the human condition through symbolic figures and scenes from Western art history such as Adam and Eve, The Expulsion from Paradise, the isolation, the temptation, the fall, and the rebirth. In this new series of works, angels and devils resemble young teenagers or vice versa. The apple and the snake are recurrent in both Jung Adam and Rebel Eva: the apples have eyes, and they look out from their point of view; the snakes are depicted as comic-like, silly worms that come out from a heart or a chest. There’s no drama but amusement, play, vulnerability—something is exceeding or lacking from the classic representation. In Jung King, the figure of a boy resembles a Peter Pan, or young hippie with a guitar, or a Renaissance page lifting his arms laughing. At his feet there are two flowers growing from two skulls (a quotation from Andy Warhol and Picasso). It is a subverted memento mori: once I finished the painting, I realized it made me think of the Pandemic. Drama and comedy, density of significance, vivacity and irony in the association among the various elements—are what move these figures. It’s a Commedia dell’Arte. All of the figures emerge from a backdrop that I painted white: it’s a non-existent space, there’s no environment or location, but a light that makes everything readable, evident, from the small pencil mark to the light spray-painted shades or the spatula mark, dense with color. The light makes evident the drawing and painting work in outlining the warmth and the interiority of the characters. The figures are contained inside a frame with blunt corners that delimit the vital space. This frame has different functions: it is the threshold from which the figures appear, a theatrical space that concentrates the gaze inside this symbolic space. It also has the shape of a smartphone with the images that scroll from social media. Every painting has its title written under the figure, this creates an association with Tarots cards where the figures of man and women are symbols and phases of the climb or the descent, which dispense the various stages of the human life, like in Tarots, where everything is in the movement and change in its own repetition.”

Wilhelm Sasnal

New Paintings and One Film



April 8, 2021 - May 15, 2021
March 26th, 2021—The eighth exhibition by Polish artist Wilhelm Sasnal at Anton Kern Gallery presents sixteen paintings and one film. Known as a painter of individual, lucidly formulated images (rather than of explorations in theme and variation, or in process) and a maker of films that speak a measured and moody language, this exhibition proposes a kind of associative way of looking. A theme or a narrative emerges only slowly. This however, does not suggest capriciousness. Quite to the contrary, these paintings and the film create a generative field of ties and connections that come closer to a nuanced and subtle analysis of the world than any predetermined credo could. There are paintings of figures walking in landscapes, or rather, interacting with nature. There are wide horizons and vast skies, and there are seemingly traditional still-lifes composed of fruits, plates, and flowers. And there is the occasional portrait of a youthful face for example. As has been frequently noted, Sasnal employs various modes of painting, from just about naturalistic to bold and improvisational, supported here by a palette that seems silently artificial. His motifs are based on visual memories, notably of the artist’s stay in Los Angeles in 2019/20, on precise image moments, often recorded with a camera or a mobile phone. These image ideas are directly translated onto the canvas without much preparatory sketching, a process that infuses these distinct paintings with a great sense of freedom. Sasnal sees himself as a painter, not as a creator of mediated images. It is the artist’s touch of the paint-filled brush onto the canvas that activates the work. Sasnal’s paintings are rooted in the desire to dissect the past and to engage with present events. Evidently, two still-lifes in the exhibition are direct allusions to paintings by Cezanne and Mondrian. Why does the artist paint such direct references? Why are there two large canvases depicting well-known artworks by the American land-artist Robert Smithson, “Glue Rundown” and most famously “Asphalt Rundown”? Why does Sasnal paint an alluringly windswept “Roosevelt Park” in Los Angeles alluding to the Works Progress Administration (WPA) in the New Deal era of the 1930s and 40s? Why is there a painting depicting the silhouette of an aircraft wing in front of an intensely blue night sky and marvelous reflections of the moon? Why does the skyline of Los Angeles float like an oversized spaceship? Perhaps the unapologetically smiling face of a youth expressing happiness and hope speaks to the notion of faith in reform and transformation alluded to in Sasnal’s paintings. Is it religious faith (there is a rather dark painting of the pope), or spiritualism as suggested by Mondrian, or, towards the other end of the spectrum, faith in progressive politics as exemplified by the New Deal? Now, the two paintings about Smithson come into sharper focus. Smithson, who realized “Asphalt Rundown” in a quarry outside of Rome, the Eternal City, demonstrating what he called the “crystalline structure of time,” arguing that time does not pass so much as it builds upon itself. The resulting sculpture is time frozen, mid flow. An astonishing commentary on Sasnal’s project of making paintings about the interconnectedness of history and the present.

Hein Koh

Hein Koh at WINDOW



March 9, 2021 - May 1, 2021
Anton Kern Gallery is pleased to present Hein Koh at WINDOW. This is the artist’s first solo exhibition of paintings. A longtime sculptor, her return to painting came about during the pandemic: a need to simplify her practice, and a desire to have the freedom to make loose, expressive, and emotional work. At WINDOW are four paintings depicting broccoli and carrot characters: figures that represent the high standards of perfection and goodness that women are held to. These vegetables, though seemingly healthy, also want to rebel--they smoke, wear sexy outfits, and push against the boundaries of societal expectations to simply, defiantly, be themselves. On the Walker Street side are three paintings depicting pairs. The artist is mother to a pair of twin girls, but the pairings here also represent couples, soulmates; as well as dualities and even the two sides of one’s self--vegetables that are good for you but also chain smoke. On the Lafayette side is a painting depicting a lone broccoli figure, another arena Koh has lately been exploring and channeling: angst, existential loneliness, and solitude. WINDOW is on view 24/7 at 91 Walker Street, just walk by and see.

Nicole Eisenman

Maquette and Paper Pulp Works



February 25, 2021 - April 3, 2021
Nicole Eisenman’s “Maquette” premiered 2018 at FIAC in Paris, the year after the artist’s monumental “Sketch for a Fountain” at Skulptur Projekte Münster had received much attention. Inspired by the fountain yet distinctly different, “Maquette” consists of four bronze bathers in varying positions of repose extending a classical theme to an acutely urgent sense of contemporaneity. The presentation of Eisenman’s paper pulp works is a follow-up to last year Incelesbian exhibition. They combine technical intricacy and sophistication with the instant legibility and punch of the language of posters. A fully illustrated catalog co-published with renown paper workshop Dieu Donné is available.

David Byrd

Montrose VA, 1958-1988



February 25, 2021 - April 3, 2021
Anton Kern Gallery is pleased to announce its forthcoming exhibition David Byrd: Montrose VA, 1958 – 1988. The opening date, February 25th, coincides with the late-artist’s 95th birthday. The exhibition centers around Byrd’s original manuscript, of the same title, chronicling his observations during his thirty-year career in the psychiatric ward of a VA hospital in Upstate New York. Compiled during the reflective period of his later years, the artist considered this handmade book his magnum opus. It serves as a crucial codex for understanding Byrd’s personal history, as well as his psychologically stirring oeuvre of paintings and works on paper. Select pages with handwritten texts, sketches, and colored pencil drawings will be displayed throughout the gallery in vitrines, accompanied by paintings, sketchbooks and other archival materials relating to this major body of work. Byrd was intent on bringing his book to the public’s attention during his lifetime, however, he struggled to find the resources to publish. To honor the artist’s vision, the gallery has released a faithful replica of Montrose VA, 1958 – 1988, in collaboration with the David Byrd Estate and German publisher Hatje Cantz. The book is available for purchase at the gallery and on our online shop. About the artist David Byrd was an American painter born in Springfield, Illinois, in 1926. His father, who suffered from mental illness, left the family when David was a young child. When he was twelve, his mother was forced by economic hardship to place him and his five siblings into foster care. In 1942, his mother gathered her children back to her in New York. Working as a ticket seller at a movie theater in Brooklyn, she could barely support them. Byrd left home at age 17 to join the Merchant Marine, and was later drafted into the US Army during World War II. He used the GI Bill to enroll at the Ozenfant School of Fine Arts in New York City, where he studied for two years under the French painter Amédée Ozenfant. Throughout the 1950s, Byrd worked a series of odd jobs-- including janitor, delivery man, movie house usher -- anything that would cover his bills while also (and more importantly) allowing him time to paint. From 1958 - 1988 he worked as an orderly in the psychiatric ward at the VA Hospital in Montrose, New York. Perhaps the regimented setting of a hospital was comfortable for him, having spent much of his young life within institutionalized systems. His daily experiences during this time inspired his most defining body of work. Byrd was a keen observer of his surroundings who painted the people and situations he encountered, past and present, from memory. He also painted scenes from his daily commute-- including mountains, bridges, houses, gas stations, and shopping centers. In 1988 he retired, bought land in the Catskills, and focused full-time on painting until his death in 2013. David Byrd’s work was not publicly exhibited until he was offered a solo show at Greg Kucera Gallery in Seattle, only a few months before his death at the age of 87. Since then, and through the establishment of the David Byrd Estate, his work has continued to be exhibited posthumously. The Estate is represented by Anton Kern Gallery.

Richard Hughes

Richard Hughes at WINDOW



January 20, 2021 - February 28, 2021
For the next iteration of WINDOW, we are pleased to present new works from UK-based artist Richard Hughes. Hughes’ practice involves making extraordinarily meticulous facsimiles of objects that most would consider detritus. He instead finds wonder in the discarded, found, and bizarre; sometimes instilling trompe l’oeil messages and images to create marvelous new livelihood in the source material. On the Lafayette side of WINDOW is one such work, Rain or Shine: a sewn recreation of an old, saggy mattress. At first glance, it is easy to perceive the object as something one ought to trash from their childhood bedroom. Look longer, and magic emerges-- the stitching of the topper actually forms a sprawling phrase in bubble letters. On the Walker side is an installation of four works, including a new stitched fabric piece accompanied by a cast mask. Consisting of sourced space t-shirts, Hughes has created a collaged galaxy out of the vintage store mundane; it is accompanied by a recreation of a face mask resting on the floor, the eyes gazing up in slightly melted wonder at the universe. Other works include a cheerfully dirty headboard; a resin cast of a half leg wearing a roller skate; and one of Hughes’ spinning works, in which a deflated ball wearing a cap grins at viewers from a dizzying metal coil. As always, we invite you to visit WINDOW anytime, day or night, at 91 Walker Street. The works are on view 24/7, just walk by.

Farah Al-Qasimi, Alvaro Barrington, Ilana Harris-Babou, Cheyenne Julien, Hein Koh, Rebecca Ness, Arthur Peña, Mike Silva, Paul Anthony Smith, Jeff Sonhouse, Tabboo!

11



January 12, 2021 - February 20, 2021
Sometimes the original beckons for a sequel…Two years after the success of our group exhibition 10, we are pleased to follow up with 11, featuring eleven artists whose work we think scores a perfect ten. Spanning a variety of media—film, installation, painting, collage, drawing, mixed media, and photography—the artists and works presented share a sense of experimentation in exploring uncharted pictorial territory rooted in the personal. Some of the works engage with traditional forms of portraiture and representation, while others run through a grayer gamut of image-making, where memory, image, symbol, avatar, and iconography defy more exacting categorization.

John Bock

Twilight Proximity Corpus



January 12, 2021 - February 20, 2021

Georg Baselitz, Ellen Berkenblit, John Bock, Brian Calvin, Anne Collier, Nathalie Du Pasquier, Nicole Eisenman, Martino Gamper, Bendix Harms, Lothar Hempel, Richard Hughes, Jim Lambie, Marepe, Chris Martin, Matthew Monahan, Alessandro Pessoli, Tal R, Wilhelm Sasnal, Lara Schnitger, David Shrigley, Francis Upritchard

NOW ON VIEW AT 16 EAST 55TH STREET



December 9, 2020 - December 23, 2020

Matthew Monahan, Lara Schnitger

Matthew Monahan, Lara Schnitger at WINDOW



October 31, 2020 - December 31, 2020
Anton Kern Gallery is pleased to present two special installations by Matthew Monahan and Lara Schnitger at WINDOW. Corner of Walker & Lafayette On view 24/7

Brian Calvin

Waiting



October 29, 2020 - December 5, 2020
Anton Kern Gallery is pleased to present Waiting, Brian Calvin’s seventh solo exhibition in New York. Faces abound, energizing the first and second floor galleries with hyperbolic color, mosaic eyes, and varnished lips. The cool neutrality of their expressions brings an equal and opposite force; a stillness to the space. Otherworldly as they are, this group of 23 new works cannot be untangled from the time within which they were created. These paintings were born out of the global pandemic, which brought life as normal to a halt.

Jim Lambie

Year Unknown



October 29, 2020 - December 5, 2020
Anton Kern Gallery is pleased to present Jim Lambie: ​Year Unknown​ on the gallery’s third floor. The exhibition features new metal boxes and sunglasses sculptures, and is a decidedly intimate one, with small scale pieces and titles that make connections to personally significant cities and streets. Lambie’s work often references music and art, here resonating in a particularly individual way––subtly invoking the album that changed your life; the concert that blew your mind; the painting that made you see the world differently. Together, the works in ​Year Unknown​ offer a contemplative and dynamic journey, one that is both of this moment but also timeless. Lambie’s transformation of humble materials––lenses, aluminum sheets, industrial paints––into these vibrant odes defies their seeming simplicity. The artist encourages the viewer to relish in color, light, and shape––finding meaning in the things we all see that unite us as humans, and the ways we can still find joy in the everyday.

Aliza Nisenbaum

Flora



September 9, 2020 - October 24, 2020
Anton Kern Gallery is pleased to present Aliza Nisenbaum: Flora, an exhibition of new works on paper on the gallery’s third floor. Image: Aliza Nisenbaum, "Self portrait bouquet" 2020, gouache and watercolor on paper, Paper Dimensions: 30 x 22 in (76.2 x 55.9 cm)

Tal R

Boy Walking and Cinnamon: Sculptures and Paintings



September 9, 2020 - October 24, 2020
Anton Kern Gallery is pleased to announce its first solo exhibition with Danish artist Tal R. The exhibition will consist of fifteen paintings and twelve bronze sculptures. Tal R is best known for his paintings and their exceptional display of energy and imagination in a colorful and exuberant universe. For the first time, he has also thrown himself into classical bronze sculpture. In Boy Walking and Cinnamon, the viewer can experience the artist’s motifs transformed into three dimensions—a striking parade of figures in patinated bronze. His creatures have arrived in New York with arms and legs, heads and paws, wings and shoes, beaks and eyes. On the first and second floors, alongside the sculptures, Tal R’s paintings unfold to the viewer using a simple compositional device to create his complex, atmospheric worlds. Image: Tal R, "Adidas Boy" 2019, Patinated bronze, 61 3/4 x 10 5/8 x 25 5/8 in (157 x 27 x 65 cm)

assume vivid astro focus

assume vivid astro focus at WINDOW



June 29, 2020 - September 7, 2020
Neon is light trapped inside a three-dimensional contained shape. They've got an irresistible and pleasing aspect to them. They've got an interesting quality of being sensuous "vintage technology" which cultivates both melancholy and wonderment in you. It's fascinating how soothing and otherworldly a neon can be. We have also explored their "neurotic" properties when animated and flickering to a programmed “choreography”. Starburst explores all of these possible neon qualities. a very anxious feeling was originally created in 2007. It was conceived as a commentary on that year’s election period, the “long” anxious months before Obama was elected. Words written in neon instigate a "holy" presence, almost like a spell from God. Neons’ frequent use as store signs (selling us “dreams”) contributes to this effect: hypnosis, rapture, worship, magic, prophecy. a very anxious feeling is part of our recurring play with our pseudonym’s initials (which end up becoming exhibition and artwork titles, email signatures, neons, etc). And it’s brought back at another “very anxious” moment in our lives. -assume vivid astro focus

Ellen Berkenblit

Sistergarden



February 20, 2020 - March 28, 2020

Nicole Eisenman

Incelesbian



February 20, 2020 - March 28, 2020

Andy Warhol

Andy Warhol Drawings



February 20, 2020 - March 28, 2020

Aliza Nisenbaum

Coreografías



September 13, 2019 - November 2, 2019

David Altmejd, John Bock, Kari Cholnoky, Lothar Hempel, Antone Könst, Jim Lambie, Thomas Lanigan-Schmidt, Marepe

Wirrwarr



September 13, 2019 - November 2, 2019

Nathalie du Pasquier



June 26, 2019 - August 16, 2019

Margot Bergman



June 26, 2019 - August 16, 2019

David Shrigley



April 25, 2019 - June 15, 2019

Julie Curtiss

Wildlife



April 25, 2019 - June 1, 2019

Dan McCarthy

7 Bangers



March 15, 2019 - April 20, 2019

Jim Lambie

Skin Shape



March 15, 2019 - April 20, 2019

Erik van Lieshout

BEER



February 7, 2019 - March 9, 2019

David Byrd



February 7, 2019 - March 9, 2019

Robert Janitz

Uptown Campus



December 13, 2018 - January 26, 2019

John Bock



November 1, 2018 - December 1, 2018

Saul Fletcher



November 1, 2018 - December 1, 2018

Matthew Monahan

frNMEz



September 12, 2018 - October 20, 2018

Ellen Berkenblit

The Clock Unlocked



September 12, 2018 - October 20, 2018

The Party: Curated by Ali Subotnick



July 12, 2018 - August 31, 2018

Nobuyoshi Araki

I , Photography



July 12, 2018 - August 31, 2018

Francis Upritchard



May 24, 2018 - June 30, 2018

Bendix Harms

SANKT RUFUS



May 24, 2018 - June 30, 2018

Anne Collier



April 12, 2018 - May 19, 2018

Chris Martin



March 1, 2018 - April 7, 2018

Sarah Jones



March 1, 2018 - April 7, 2018